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Rising from Lava, the Sacred Hawaiian Ohia Tree

Like an erupting volcano, the Ohia Lehua Tree signals the completion of one cycle and illuminates a new beginning.  The indigenous Haw...

Sunday, August 7, 2016

Kiwi, the Little Hawaiian Witch

Creating a miniature Menehune witch combining colors, dress codes and accessories pertaining to Hawaii challenged my imagination. 
But here she is: 

Birth Date: 'Aukake 7, 2016 (08-07-16)
 
Kiwi’s magical Mana (spiritual energy) casts blessings of love and joy.

Kiwi zooms on her broom over the Menehune's village, casting blessings and magical spells of Aloha (love) upon everyone she meets. Kiwi’s happiness is contagious and in no time all everybody wears big smiles on their faces.

Kiwi is a little Kahuna (magician) of joy!

Kiwi's Aumakua (Guardian Spirit) is the Hawaiian Peʻape'a (bat). Pe'a's messages come to Kiwi in visions and dreams. Kiwi always follows Pe'ape'a’s guidance and advise knowing that it will keep her and her Menehune Ohana (family) save from all harm and lead them to happiness and good fortune. Kiwi knows that Pe'ape'a carries the Mana of supernatural powers.


Kiwi’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed her skirt, top and hat out of silky black material. She decorated the hat with a purple feather lei. Tutu crocheted purple panties and matching pointy witch’s shoes. She decorated Kiwi's top and the tips of the shoes with purple crystals. Tutu drew a purple Pe'ape'a on the front of Kiwi's skirt to invoke the protection of her Aumakua. The color purple symbolizes magic and matches Kiwi's mystical spirit.
Tutu put an orange Plumeria flower behind Kiwi's ear. It looks just perfect in her beautiful orange hair. Last Tutu gave Kiwi her magical flying witch broom.
All these things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Kiwi is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kiwi has tiny little hands and feet, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Kiwi is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kiwi brings you the magical spirit of Hawaii.






Saturday, July 30, 2016

Water is life, life is water!

Akaka Falls

He ola ka wai, he wai ke ola!
Water is life, life is water!

Akaka Falls cascades 442 feet into a stream-eroded gorge feeding the lush forest. It is a Wailele (waterfall) symbolic in myth and legend. 
The main Hawaiian God, Kane, the creator, is the keeper of the precious Wai (water). He is the giver of life to the earth and all who dwell there.

"He Wai a Kane

Aia e-hea ka Wai a Kane?
Aia i-lalo, i ka honua, i ka wai hu,
i ka wai kau a Kane me Kanaloa
He wai-puna, he wai e inu,
He wai e mana, he wai e ola.
E ola no e-a!

The Water of Kane

Where flows the water of Kane?
Deep in the ground, in the gushing spring,
In the ducts of Kane and Kanaloa,
A well-spring of water, to drink,
A water of magic power, The water of life!
Life! O give us this life!"

(Unwritten Literature of Hawaii, by Nathaniel B. Emerson, 1909)

People of old deeply appreciated and honored life giving Wai, the very element that sustains all life. The purity and vibrancy of the water determined the health of the island and the people. Strict Kapu (taboo) was used to maintain the clarity of the water of life.


Hawaiians honored the Akua (gods) who guard the Wai 
to preserve its Ma'ema'e (purity).


Hawaiian legend tells the story of Akaka Falls, where a handsome young warrior chief named Akaka lived with his wife in the little village of Honomu. 
But Akaka also was in love with two beautiful goddesses, Maile and Lehua, who he would secretly meet in the forest when his wife was away.
When his wife found out about the affairs, Akaka was deeply ashamed and ran into the forest. He was so saddened that he lost his footing, fell of a steep cliff and turned into a huge waterfall.
His lovers, Maile and Lehua, were heartbroken. They cried so hard that they turned into the two smaller falls on each side of Akaka Falls. According to legend, a smaller flow downstream called Kahuna represents Akaka's faithful wife, still by his side.
If you listen closely on still and moonless nights, you can hear his wife, muffled by the roar of the falls, still calling for Akaka.
Tradition says that if you strike the large rock at the top of the waterfall with a Lehua twig or wrap a Maile lei around it, rain will fall, because Lehua and Maile always made Akaka's wife weep.

The indigenous Hawaiian Ohia Tree also is vital of Hawaii's natural ecosystem and water supply.

The Ohia Tree is the first form of life to grow directly out of the hardened black lava. 

Its beautiful red flowers are called Lehua, which means "Flower sacred to the Gods" in the Hawaiian language. The red Lehua flower is the official flower of the Big Island of Hawaii. Native Hawaiians used to make a medicinal potion out of the Ohia Tree’s bark and leaves. It was meant to spark a strong, passionate, inward fire to grow, bloom, and rejoice in life. The Ohia Lehua Tree is said to grant visions of the future, offering inspirations to manifest personal transformation. It signals the completion of one cycle and illuminates a new beginning.
The Ohia Lehua Tree has been sacred to the Hawaiian people since ancient times and is often mentioned in legends, hula, songs, and chants.
The Lehua is also known as Pele’s Flower. In Hawaiian mythology, Ohia and Lehua were two lovers. The Volcano Goddess Pele desired Ohia. But Ohia only had eyes for Lehua. His rejection made Pele so furious that she turned him into a tree. Lehua was devastated by losing her lover. Out of pity, the gods turned her into a flower which they placed on Ohia's tree. Hawaiians believe that it rains when a Lehua flower is picked from the Ohia tree, signifying the tears of these eternal lovers.

The Ohia Lehua Tree is a powerful symbol of all that is Hawaii.

Vital to Hawaii's natural ecosystem, the Ohia Tree provides an essential food source for native birds and bugs. The bark of the Ohia tree captures the mist of the forest and lets it slowly seep into the ground, which replenishes the Island's water supply.
The Ohia tree is Hawaii's iconic tree that is most responsible for replenishing the Island's water sources. Now it is being attacked by a fungus disease and seriously endangered. 
At one time, Hawaiians bathed, swam and drank from the abundance of clean, clear water on the Islands, Today these same waters are often tainted with disease and pollution.

We all can contribute to prevent further contamination 
with attention, awareness and Aloha!

Take on the challenge to protect the Island's precious water sources 
by avoiding pollution and waste!




Menehune dolls Akaka and Lehua were created in honor of Hawaii's precious water sources and Ohia forests.


Akaka and Lehua
Birth Date: Lulai 31, 2016 (07/31/16)

He ola ka wai, he wai ke ola!
Water is life, life is water!

Akaka and Lehua bless you with life giving water and the magic of the Lehua flower.

"Akaka, look at the beautiful Lehua flowers all around us!" Lehua calls out to her brother. Lehua is named after the magical flower of the sacred Hawaiian Ohia Tree. Lehua means 'Flower of the Gods'. Honoring the Mana (spiritual energy) of the forest, Lehua humbly asks permission from the Akuas (gods), before she starts gathering some of the flowers. She will pick just enough to make a special Ohia Lehua lei for her beloved Tutu (grandmother). Akaka helps his sister for a while and when they both become thirsty, he walks down to the pond below the Wailele (waterfall) to fill up his gourd with the pure, clear water.
Akaka and Lehua honor Hawaii's life giving Kumu Wais (water sources), which are continuously replenished through the moisture in the bark of the Ohia Tree.
Everybody in the Ohana (family) contributes to maintain the purity and vibrancy of the Kumu Wais and the Ohia Trees.


Tutu sewed Lehua's mountain green dress and Akaka's matching lava lava (wraparound). She drew Lehua flowers on the bottom of Lehua's dress and crocheted green panties and matching little shoes. Last Tutu created a special Ohia Lehua hairpiece for beautiful little Lehua.
Akaka is named after the famous 400 feet waterfall on the Big Island. Tutu drew a waterfall design and 2 Lehua flowers on his lava lava. She wove a special white feather lei for Akaka which symbolizes the sacred Wailele.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Tutu picked the most beautiful of the Ipus for Akaka's Ipu Wai (water gourd). She cleaned, polished and decorated with the drawing of a Lehua flower. Tutu blessed the Ipu Wai with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. The water gourd is sacred now. It was created for Akaka and only he is allowed to touch it. The Ipu Wai became Akaka’s most treasured possession.
All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opunas.


Akaka and Lehua are about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Akaka and Lekua have tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and belly buttons.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Akaka and Lehua are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Akaka and Lehua inspire us to protect our precious water sources and forests 
with attention, awareness and Aloha.







Friday, July 22, 2016

Aniani, Reflections from the Heart

Birth Date: Lulai 21, 2016 (07-21-16)

Aniani ho'onui 'ike
Reflections enlarge visions

Aniani's reflections from the heart enable true visions.

Aniani plays happily at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach with her brother Kanaloa.


Every once in a while she gazes into her little hand mirror and reflects on all the beauty around her. She observes and listens without judgment from the eye of her heart. Aniani has a gift of resolving any turmoil among her Ohana (family). She simply seeks the reflections of Aka, the essence of life and light. Soon Aniani is blessed with a true vision to the solution, which will restore peace and happiness for all.


Aniani's Tutu (grandmother) lovingly crafted her hand mirror out of mirror glass, bamboo, fabric and crystals. Tutu blessed the mirror with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. It is sacred now. The mirror was created for Aniani's visions and only she is allowed to touch it.
Tutu sewed a beautiful ocean blue dress with a moon and star design. She crocheted blue panties and blue little shoes.


Last Tutu created a special Plumeria hairpiece for beautiful little Aniani. All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


 Aniani is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Aniani has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Aniani is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Aniani reflects the essence of life and light.

Kanaloa, Hawaiian God of the Ocean


In Hawaiian mythology Kanaloa is the god of the ocean and the ocean winds. He is one of the four major gods of Hawaii: Kane, Kanaloa, Ku and Lono. Kanaloa was strongly connected with Kane, the creator of all life. When the people in old Hawaiians built a canoe they would invoke Kane's blessing for the building and Kanaloa's for its sailing.
On their journeys together Kanaloa and Kane would share the sacred drink of 'Awa (drink of the gods). Striking the ground with their staffs they caused hidden springs of fresh water to burst forth.


Ki'is (statues) show Kanaloa wearing a headdress that touches the ground connecting the conscious and unconscious mind, integrating the upper and lower selves.
Statues of Kanaloa feature him with round eyes, unlike those of any other representations of the gods.

Eye of Kanaloa

According to a Kauai tradition, if you could look into the eye of Kanaloa you would see the symbol of Pono (goodness) and be healed. Kanaloa is a healer god. One of his Kinolaus (forms) is the He'e (octopus), which was believed to make sickness flee.



Ka-na-loa means 'grounded'. 
Kanaloa reminds us that a solid foundation brings security, strength and healing.

The great Hawaiian healing Ocean God inspired the creation of Menehune Kanaloa.


Birth Date: Lulai 21, 2016 (07-21-16)

Kanaloa offers a solid foundation of security, strength and health.

Kanaloa plays happily at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach with his sister Aniani.

The ocean and the beach is where Kanaloa feels at home. After all he is named after the great Hawaiian Healer God of the Ocean. Kanaloa is filled with Pono (goodness) and possesses the Mana (spiritual energy) of healing. 
The He'e (octopus) is his Aumakua (guardian spirit), whose messages come to him in visions and dreams. Kanaloa always follows He'e’s guidance and advise. He knows that it will lead him and his Ohana (family) to health and happiness. 
Kanaloa's Kukui Nut Ihoiho (torch) is the shining heart of truth and love. According to ancient Hawaiian beliefs Kukui represents the inner light of spirit shining brightly.

Kanaloa’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Aloha (love) and Mana into her Mo’opuna Kane’s (grandson) Maile lei. Maile is the lei of eternal love. Tutu also sewed his lava lava (wraparound) out of ocean blue cotton. Last Tutu drew Kanaloa's Aumakua, a red He'e on the lava lava to invoke blessings and protection.
Kanaloa and his Kuku (grandfather) made the Ihoiho (torch) out of bamboo and Maile leaves. They fueled it with Kukui Nut oil. Kuku blessed the Ihoiho with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. It is sacred now. The Ihoiho was created for Kanaloa and only he is allowed to touch it.
All these precious things were Tutu’s and Kuku's gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).

Kanaloa is about 4” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kanaloa has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.

Kanaloa is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kanaloa channels the Mana of healing.




Saturday, July 16, 2016

Kaua'i, the Garden Isle

Kaua'i is the oldest of the Hawaiian Islands. Mysterious and beautiful, covered with tropical rain forest, waterfalls and endless rainbows, it has been named 'the Garden Isle'.
The lush beauty of the 'Garden Isle' inspired the creation of Menehune Boy Kaua'i and his Honu (turtle).



Birthdate: Lulai 16, 2016 (07/16/16)

Kauai’s music illuminates life with joy and happiness.

Living Hawaii’s Aloha spirit, Kaua'i and Honu (Turtle) have all the time in the world. Together they meander through the beautiful forest in the Kaiholena Mountains cherishing all they see, hear, and feel. Wonderful and exciting things keep happening. Everywhere they go they are greeted with kindness and abundance: the sun warms their bodies, the birds sing their most beautiful songs, flowers open to embrace them with their sweet scent. When they are hungry food appears on their path, a crunchy green leaf for Honu, a big yellow Mai’a (banana) for Kaua'i. The small mountain stream offers cool, fresh water for them to drink their fill.
The delightful sound of Kaua'i's Ukulele echoes across the Aina (land) accompanying his songs about the Menehune Ohana (family), Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe.

Honu Iki and Honu remind us that there is always more than enough time to fulfill all desires. 
Their cheerful Mana (Spiritual Energy) brightens up the day with love and laughter.

Kauai is named after the oldest of the Hawaiian Islands, mysterious and charming Kauai, also called the 'Garden Isle'.
Honu is Kaua'i’s Aumakua (guardian spirit) and she has become his faithful companion. Kaua'i is deeply connected with the ancient wisdom of Honu. In Hawaii the Honu represents long life, safety, peace, and good luck.



Kaua'i’sTutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Hulu (feather) leis he wears around his neck and Lauhala hat. In Hawaii the Hulu lei symbolizes love, honor and respect. Tutu also sewed Kaua'i's lava lava (wraparound) out of white cotton and crocheted yellow underwear and matching shoes. Last she put a white Plumeria Flower on Honu who loves its beauty and sweet fragrance.
The Ukulele was Kuku’s (grandfather’s) gift of lasting love and Aloha to his beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson). It is Kaua'i’s most cherished possession. He holds it even when he goes to sleep.



Kaua'i is about 4” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kaua'i has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. Honu is about 1" long. The body is made out of faux fur and wired for flexibility. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


In the evenings Kaua'i often accompanies the Hula dances of his little sister Ola (Life) with his Ukulele. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Kaua'i and Honu are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kaua'i and Honu channel the Aloha spirit of Hawaii.




Friday, July 15, 2016

Ola, Life in Hawaii

Birth Date: Lulai 15, 2016 (07/15/16)

Aloha Mai
I come with love.

Ola's Hula honors the miracle of life.
Join her in a celebration of life’s joys and abundance!

Celebrating the glorious magnificence of life, Ola dances the ancient Hawaiian Kahiko Hula in harmony to the rhythm of her Pu'ili (dancing sticks).
The beautiful movements of her hands and body tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and the Menehune Ohana (family). Ola's dancing sticks enhance the rhythm and add excitement to her dance.


Ola's Tutu (grandmother) is her Kumu Hula (Hula Teacher). She taught her the powerful movements of the Kahiko Hula.
After Tutu and Ola carved the Pu'ili carved out of bamboo, Tutu blessed them with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. The dancing sticks are sacred now. They were created for Ola and only she is allowed to touch them.
Tutu also hand crafted the traditional pink hula skirt. She sewed a green top and skirt for Ola and crocheted pink little shoes. Tutu wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into Ola's green feather and sweet smelling Puakenikeni flower Haku (head lei) and wrist leis. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine. All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Ola is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Ola has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.


In the evenings Ola's brother Kauai often accompanies her Hula dances with his Ukulele. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Ola is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Ola's dance honors the sacredness of life.





Thursday, July 7, 2016

Poi, Sacred Life-Giving Food of Hawaii

Pohaku, the Stone, is sacred in Hawaii

Pohakus represent the Akuas (gods), the earth and the profound relationship Hawaiians have with nature and each other.
Pohaku is considered the foundation and always honored and treated with respect.
Pohakus have Mana (spiritual power). There are stones for healing and birthing, stones representing gods, stones for Ki‘i pohaku (petroglyphs), stones to build Heiaus (altars) and stones for tools.

Poi Pounder

The Ku'i 'ai Pohaku, or poi pounder, is the most valuable Hawaiian stone tool. It is carved out of a gray lava. For many hours ancient Hawaiians shaped it patiently with a hammer stone and polished it with another stone until the shape of a cylindrical neck topped by a knob and with a flared bottom was completed.

Taro

It was used to make Poi from the corm of the Taro plant, which was a sacred, life-giving, ancestral food for native Hawaiians. 80 different species of Kalo or Taro are known in Hawaii. All parts of the Taro plant were used; as food or for religious and medicinal purposes. The potato shaped Taro bulb was cooked and pounded to a paste with the Ku'i 'ai pohaku.

Poi

Traditionally, the making of Poi was a ceremony of life that brought the Ohana (family) together. Ohana literally means 'all from the shoots'. The Kalo or Taro corm grows the Keikis (children) of the plant. Planting the Taro, making and eating Poi, all symbolize a deep family bond. Everybody in the Ohana worked in the Taro patch in the spirit of Hoolaulima (working together).
The Hawaiian saying 'take time to eat Poi' means 'slow down and enjoy life and health'.
Due to the many health benefits of Poi, ancient Hawaiians were one of the healthiest races on earth. Up to this day Poi is used for the prevention and cure of many health conditions.

Poi is a sacred food of great cultural significance.

The sacred Pohaku and life-giving Poi inspired the creation of Menehune Boy
Kalo, the Poi Maker.

Kalo (Taro), the Poi Maker
Birth Date: Lulai 4, 2016 (07-04-16)

Kalo inspires us to enjoy life to the fullest.

In the spirit of Hoolaulima (working together), Kalo was working with his Ohana (family) in the Taro patch all day long. Everybody was laughing, singing, telling stories and enjoying each other's company. Now the Taro bulb is ready to be cooked and then pounded into sacred, life-giving Poi.
Poi is Kalo's favorite food. It is a lot of work to pound the cooked Taro into a paste with his Ku'i 'ai pohaku (Poi pounder). But it is worth every minute of it because Poi just tastes so good. Kalo is named after the Taro plant which produces this delicious dish.


Kalo blesses you with his life giving Taro plant.

Kalo and his Kuku (grandfather) carved the Ku'i 'ai pohaku out of black lava. For many hours they shaped it patiently with a hammer stone and polished it with another stone until the shape of a cylindrical neck topped by a knob and with a flared bottom was completed. Afterwards they carved a wooden bowl out of Koa to mash the taro in.
Kalo's’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed his yellow Malu (wraparound) and matching hat and adorned it with Taro leaves. Tutu also crocheted yellow little shoes. Last Tutu gave Kalo his own little Taro plant to nurture and take care of.
All these things were Kuku's and Tutu’s sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).


Kalo is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kalo has little hands, feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Kalo is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his Taro plant, his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kalo reflects the life giving Mana of the Taro.