Friday, July 22, 2016

Aniani, Reflections from the Heart

Birth Date: Lulai 21, 2016 (07-21-16)

Aniani ho'onui 'ike
Reflections enlarge visions

Aniani's reflections from the heart enable true visions.

Aniani plays happily at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach with her brother Kanaloa.


Every once in a while she gazes into her little hand mirror and reflects on all the beauty around her. She observes and listens without judgment from the eye of her heart. Aniani has a gift of resolving any turmoil among her Ohana (family). She simply seeks the reflections of Aka, the essence of life and light. Soon Aniani is blessed with a true vision to the solution, which will restore peace and happiness for all.


Aniani's Tutu (grandmother) lovingly crafted her hand mirror out of mirror glass, bamboo, fabric and crystals. Tutu blessed the mirror with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. It is sacred now. The mirror was created for Aniani's visions and only she is allowed to touch it.
Tutu sewed a beautiful ocean blue dress with a moon and star design. She crocheted blue panties and blue little shoes.


Last Tutu created a special Plumeria hairpiece for beautiful little Aniani. All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


 Aniani is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Aniani has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Aniani is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Aniani reflects the essence of life and light.

Kanaloa, Hawaiian God of the Ocean


In Hawaiian mythology Kanaloa is the god of the ocean and the ocean winds. He is one of the four major gods of Hawaii: Kane, Kanaloa, Ku and Lono. Kanaloa was strongly connected with Kane, the creator of all life. When the people in old Hawaiians built a canoe they would invoke Kane's blessing for the building and Kanaloa's for its sailing.
On their journeys together Kanaloa and Kane would share the sacred drink of 'Awa (drink of the gods). Striking the ground with their staffs they caused hidden springs of fresh water to burst forth.


Ki'is (statues) show Kanaloa wearing a headdress that touches the ground connecting the conscious and unconscious mind, integrating the upper and lower selves.
Statues of Kanaloa feature him with round eyes, unlike those of any other representations of the gods.

Eye of Kanaloa

According to a Kauai tradition, if you could look into the eye of Kanaloa you would see the symbol of Pono (goodness) and be healed. Kanaloa is a healer god. One of his Kinolaus (forms) is the He'e (octopus), which was believed to make sickness flee.



Ka-na-loa means 'grounded'. 
Kanaloa reminds us that a solid foundation brings security, strength and healing.

The great Hawaiian healing Ocean God inspired the creation of Menehune Kanaloa.


Birth Date: Lulai 21, 2016 (07-21-16)

Kanaloa offers a solid foundation of security, strength and health.

Kanaloa plays happily at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach with his sister Aniani.

The ocean and the beach is where Kanaloa feels at home. After all he is named after the great Hawaiian Healer God of the Ocean. Kanaloa is filled with Pono (goodness) and possesses the Mana (spiritual energy) of healing. 
The He'e (octopus) is his Aumakua (guardian spirit), whose messages come to him in visions and dreams. Kanaloa always follows He'e’s guidance and advise. He knows that it will lead him and his Ohana (family) to health and happiness. 
Kanaloa's Kukui Nut Ihoiho (torch) is the shining heart of truth and love. According to ancient Hawaiian beliefs Kukui represents the inner light of spirit shining brightly.

Kanaloa’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Aloha (love) and Mana into her Mo’opuna Kane’s (grandson) Maile lei. Maile is the lei of eternal love. Tutu also sewed his lava lava (wraparound) out of ocean blue cotton. Last Tutu drew Kanaloa's Aumakua, a red He'e on the lava lava to invoke blessings and protection.
Kanaloa and his Kuku (grandfather) made the Ihoiho (torch) out of bamboo and Maile leaves. They fueled it with Kukui Nut oil. Kuku blessed the Ihoiho with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. It is sacred now. The Ihoiho was created for Kanaloa and only he is allowed to touch it.
All these precious things were Tutu’s and Kuku's gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).

Kanaloa is about 4” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kanaloa has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.

Kanaloa is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kanaloa channels the Mana of healing.




Saturday, July 16, 2016

Kaua'i, the Garden Isle

Kaua'i is the oldest of the Hawaiian Islands. Mysterious and beautiful, covered with tropical rain forest, waterfalls and endless rainbows, it has been named 'the Garden Isle'.
The lush beauty of the 'Garden Isle' inspired the creation of Menehune Boy Kaua'i and his Honu (turtle).


Birthdate: Lulai 16, 2016 (07/16/16)

Kauai’s music illuminates life with joy and happiness.

Living Hawaii’s Aloha spirit, Kaua'i and Honu (Turtle) have all the time in the world. Together they meander through the beautiful forest in the Kaiholena Mountains cherishing all they see, hear, and feel. Wonderful and exciting things keep happening. Everywhere they go they are greeted with kindness and abundance: the sun warms their bodies, the birds sing their most beautiful songs, flowers open to embrace them with their sweet scent. When they are hungry food appears on their path, a crunchy green leaf for Honu, a big yellow Mai’a (banana) for Kaua'i. The small mountain stream offers cool, fresh water for them to drink their fill.
The delightful sound of Kaua'i's Ukulele echoes across the Aina (land) accompanying his songs about the Menehune Ohana (family), Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe.

Honu Iki and Honu remind us that there is always more than enough time to fulfill all desires. 
Their cheerful Mana (Spiritual Energy) brightens up the day with love and laughter.

Kauai is named after the oldest of the Hawaiian Islands, mysterious and charming Kauai, also called the 'Garden Isle'.
Honu is Kaua'i’s Aumakua (guardian spirit) and she has become his faithful companion. Kaua'i is deeply connected with the ancient wisdom of Honu. In Hawaii the Honu represents long life, safety, peace, and good luck.


Kaua'i’sTutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Hulu (feather) leis he wears around his neck and Lauhala hat. In Hawaii the Hulu lei symbolizes love, honor and respect. Tutu also sewed Kaua'i's lava lava (wraparound) out of white cotton and crocheted yellow underwear and matching shoes. Last she put a white Plumeria Flower on Honu who loves its beauty and sweet fragrance.
The Ukulele was Kuku’s (grandfather’s) gift of lasting love and Aloha to his beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson). It is Kaua'i’s most cherished possession. He holds it even when he goes to sleep.


Kaua'i is about 4” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kaua'i has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. Honu is about 1" long. The body is made out of faux fur and wired for flexibility. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


In the evenings Kaua'i often accompanies the Hula dances of his little sister Ola (Life) with his Ukulele. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Kaua'i and Honu are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kaua'i and Honu channel the Aloha spirit of Hawaii.



Friday, July 15, 2016

Ola, Life in Hawaii

Birth Date: Lulai 15, 2016 (07/15/16)

Aloha Mai
I come with love.

Ola's Hula honors the miracle of life.
Join her in a celebration of life’s joys and abundance!

Celebrating the glorious magnificence of life, Ola dances the ancient Hawaiian Kahiko Hula in harmony to the rhythm of her Pu'ili (dancing sticks).
The beautiful movements of her hands and body tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and the Menehune Ohana (family). Ola's dancing sticks enhance the rhythm and add excitement to her dance.


Ola's Tutu (grandmother) is her Kumu Hula (Hula Teacher). She taught her the powerful movements of the Kahiko Hula.
After Tutu and Ola carved the Pu'ili carved out of bamboo, Tutu blessed them with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. The dancing sticks are sacred now. They were created for Ola and only she is allowed to touch them.
Tutu also hand crafted the traditional pink hula skirt. She sewed a green top and skirt for Ola and crocheted pink little shoes. Tutu wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into Ola's green feather and sweet smelling Puakenikeni flower Haku (head lei) and wrist leis. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine. All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Ola is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Ola has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.


In the evenings Ola's brother Kauai often accompanies her Hula dances with his Ukulele. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Ola is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Ola's dance honors the sacredness of life.





Thursday, July 7, 2016

Poi, Sacred Life-Giving Food of Hawaii

Pohaku, the Stone, is sacred in Hawaii

Pohakus represent the Akuas (gods), the earth and the profound relationship Hawaiians have with nature and each other.
Pohaku is considered the foundation and always honored and treated with respect.
Pohakus have Mana (spiritual power). There are stones for healing and birthing, stones representing gods, stones for Ki‘i pohaku (petroglyphs), stones to build Heiaus (altars) and stones for tools.

Poi Pounder

The Ku'i 'ai Pohaku, or poi pounder, is the most valuable Hawaiian stone tool. It is carved out of a gray lava. For many hours ancient Hawaiians shaped it patiently with a hammer stone and polished it with another stone until the shape of a cylindrical neck topped by a knob and with a flared bottom was completed.

Taro

It was used to make Poi from the corm of the Taro plant, which was a sacred, life-giving, ancestral food for native Hawaiians. 80 different species of Kalo or Taro are known in Hawaii. All parts of the Taro plant were used; as food or for religious and medicinal purposes. The potato shaped Taro bulb was cooked and pounded to a paste with the Ku'i 'ai pohaku.

Poi

Traditionally, the making of Poi was a ceremony of life that brought the Ohana (family) together. Ohana literally means 'all from the shoots'. The Kalo or Taro corm grows the Keikis (children) of the plant. Planting the Taro, making and eating Poi, all symbolize a deep family bond. Everybody in the Ohana worked in the Taro patch in the spirit of Hoolaulima (working together).
The Hawaiian saying 'take time to eat Poi' means 'slow down and enjoy life and health'.
Due to the many health benefits of Poi, ancient Hawaiians were one of the healthiest races on earth. Up to this day Poi is used for the prevention and cure of many health conditions.

Poi is a sacred food of great cultural significance.

The sacred Pohaku and life-giving Poi inspired the creation of Menehune Boy
Kalo, the Poi Maker.

Kalo (Taro), the Poi Maker
Birth Date: Lulai 4, 2016 (07-04-16)

Kalo inspires us to enjoy life to the fullest.

In the spirit of Hoolaulima (working together), Kalo was working with his Ohana (family) in the Taro patch all day long. Everybody was laughing, singing, telling stories and enjoying each other's company. Now the Taro bulb is ready to be cooked and then pounded into sacred, life-giving Poi.
Poi is Kalo's favorite food. It is a lot of work to pound the cooked Taro into a paste with his Ku'i 'ai pohaku (Poi pounder). But it is worth every minute of it because Poi just tastes so good. Kalo is named after the Taro plant which produces this delicious dish.


Kalo blesses you with his life giving Taro plant.

Kalo and his Kuku (grandfather) carved the Ku'i 'ai pohaku out of black lava. For many hours they shaped it patiently with a hammer stone and polished it with another stone until the shape of a cylindrical neck topped by a knob and with a flared bottom was completed. Afterwards they carved a wooden bowl out of Koa to mash the taro in.
Kalo's’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed his yellow Malu (wraparound) and matching hat and adorned it with Taro leaves. Tutu also crocheted yellow little shoes. Last Tutu gave Kalo his own little Taro plant to nurture and take care of.
All these things were Kuku's and Tutu’s sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).


Kalo is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kalo has little hands, feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Kalo is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his Taro plant, his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kalo reflects the life giving Mana of the Taro.





Sunday, July 3, 2016

Rising from Lava, the Sacred Hawaiian Ohia Tree

Like an erupting volcano, the Ohia Lehua Tree signals the completion of one cycle and illuminates a new beginning. 

The indigenous Hawaiian Ohia Tree is the first form of life to grow directly out of the hardened black lava. Its beautiful red flowers are called Lehua, which means "Flower sacred to the Gods" in the Hawaiian language. The red Lehua flower is the official flower of the Big Island of Hawaii. The Ohia Tree is vital to Hawaii's natural ecosystem. It provides an essential food source for native birds and bugs.

Pele, Hawaiian Volcano Goddess

The Lehua is also known as Pele’s Flower. In Hawaiian mythology, Ohia and Lehua were two lovers. The Volcano Goddess Pele desired Ohia. But Ohia only had eyes for Lehua. His rejection made Pele so furious that she turned him into a tree. Lehua was devastated by losing her lover. Out of pity, the gods turned her into a flower which they placed on Ohia's tree. Hawaiians believe that it rains when a Lehua flower is picked from the Ohia tree, signifying the tears of these eternal lovers.

The Ohia Lehua Tree has been sacred to the Hawaiian people since ancient times and is often mentioned in legends, hula, songs, and chants.

Native Hawaiians used to make a medicinal potion out of the Ohia Tree’s bark and leaves. It was meant to spark a strong, passionate, inward fire to grow, bloom, and rejoice in life. The Ohia Lehua Tree is said to grant visions of the future, offering inspirations to manifest personal transformation. It signals the completion of one cycle and illuminates a new beginning.

The Ohia Lehua Tree is a powerful symbol of all that is Hawaii.

Menehune Girl Pele was created in honor of Hawaii's Volcano Goddess and the sacred Ohia Tree.

Pele, Hawaiian Volcano Goddess
Birthdate: Lulai 3, 2016 (07-03-16)

Pele offers her strength and passion to remind us that life’s fiery eruptions and emotional upheavals often clear the path for positive transformations.

Aloha e Pele! (Greetings, Pele!)
The Menehunes clap their hands, jumping up and down with excitement as soon as Pele emerges from the sacred Ohia forest.
Pele always brings the most fascinating news about the flaming spirit of Hawaii’s Volcano Goddess hurling fiery ribbons of lava down the mountain slopes, giving birth to new rock formations and land.
The Volcano Goddess Pele is closely associated with the indigenous Hawaiian Ohia Tree, which is the first form of life to grow directly out of the hardened black lava. Its beautiful red flowers are called Lehua, which means "Flower sacred to the Gods" in the Hawaiian language.

As a gift and blessing Pele offers you a small Ohia tree with a red Lehua flower. 
The tree embodies the light of spirit, knowledge and life.
It illuminates a new beginning.

Gifted with a passionate spirit, little Menehune girl Pele was named after Hawaii’s Fire Goddess.
Pele’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into Pele's Ohia Lehua and sweet smelling Puakenikeni flower Haku (head lei). Tutu also sewed Pele’s red and black skirt and top reflecting hot and hardened lava.
She crocheted black panties and matching shoes. All these things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha (Love) for her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Pele’s abundant red and black hair cascades down her back like the lava flow on the mountain slope.


Pele is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Pele has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.
Pele is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Pele blesses you with her sacred Hawaiian Ohia Tree.






Saturday, June 25, 2016

Makani, the Winds of Hawaii

La'amaomao, Goddess of the Wind

Gentle and soothing to fierce and dangerous, the Makani (winds) of Hawaii possess great Mana (spiritual energy). Many ancient cultures regard wind as the highest expression of divine spirit. It sustains life, refreshes and purifies. We delight in its blessings, but at times also suffer its powerful wrath.

The ancient people of Hawaii had an intimate knowledge of the wind. They named at least 63 different kinds of winds, like:

Pu'uokona, the wind of Kuli'ou'ou,
Ma-ua, the wind of Niu,
Holouha, the wind of Kekaha,
Maunuunu, the wind of Wai'alae,
The wind of Le'ahi turns here and there,
'Olauniu, the wind of Kahaloa,
Wai'oma'o, the wind of Palolo,
Kuehu-lepo, the wind of Kahua,
Kukalahale, the wind of Honolulu

The wind taught the Hawaiians many of their exceptional navigational abilities. The people of old Hawaii were also inventors of the lupe (kite). The kite helped them to understand the relationship between the winds and the weather.


One legend tells about La'amaomao, Goddess of the Winds, who cared for the Ipu Makani (calabash of the winds), which was believed to contain the power of the winds. Eventually the demigod Maui came to possess the Calabash of the Winds.

Maui chanted:
"Open the calabash, set the winds free,
They will fly fast, across the wide sea.
My kite will dance with the shake and the shiver."

He lifted the cover of the calabash, and the winds, freed from their trap, rushed out and sailed toward the coast.
The winds whipped their way along river gorges and tore over the peaks. As they swept toward the river, they spotted the kite. To the winds, the kite looked like a monster. They rumbled toward it, eager to destroy the invader.
Maui stood upon the lava rocks, holding the cord of his kite with all his strength. The kite moved with the winds. It turned somersaults; it whirled and twisted, swirled and stretched. With each blow of the winds, the kite sailed higher, faster, its dance turning ragged and wild.
Maui's heart pounded with joy. He loved to match his strength against the powerful winds.
The kite struggled as the fierce winds attacked. Now the winds stirred up storms that rushed inland, and as waves crashed on shore, the winds climbed to the highest part of the sky.
High above the mountains, the winds gathered strength again and crashed violently against the kite, bending it backward and forward. The kapa was strong, and the kite did not tear, but even Maui strained holding his kite.
The winds were relentless, and suddenly the cord snapped and the kite tumbled over the volcano craters, somersaulting over mountain peaks.
But Maui was determined to win this contest. With one leap he crossed the mountains and reattached the cord to his bruised and battered kite, but this time, when the winds grew too wild, he brought the kite down.
Day after day he flew his kite, entertaining himself, until one day the people began to notice the dancing kite. They watched, dazzled by the dancing kapa, and after a while they understood that when the kite soared in the sky, the weather would be dry, the wind brisk but not too wild. On those days they rejoiced.
But when Maui's kite whipped this way and that, the people warned each other. "Maui's kite is in the heavens," they would say. On those days Maui tied his line to the great black stones that lay in the riverbed, and the people knew they must protect their homes from furious winds and the coming storms.
Maui taught the people the relationship between the winds and the weather and how this knowledge could be used to assist fishermen and farmers.
The people began to call him "Maui, whose kite foretells the weather".

Little Menehune Girl La'a was created in honor of the divine winds of Hawaii.

 La'a, Goddess of the Wind
Birth Date: Lune 25, 2016 (06-25-16)

Allow the fresh breezes of La'a to guide you towards your full potential.

It is a glorious summer day with the perfect wind for La'a to fly her beloved Lupe (kite). She runs along the beach with her black hair and white cape flying in the wind. Her kite is sailing, dancing, whirling and swirling in the air. It is so much fun! La'a could fly her Lupe forever.

La'a's name means 'Sacred'. She is named after La'amaomao, the Goddess of the winds.
La'a's  Amakua (guardian spirit) is the Hīhīmanu (sting ray). La'a's Kuku (grandfather) built her kite in the image of the sting ray in order to enhance La'a's connection to her Aumakua.

La'a’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into La'a's Maile Haku (head lei) and neck lei. Maile is the lei of eternal love. Tutu also sewed La'a’s white skirt, top and wind cape. She crocheted white panties and matching shoes. All these things were Tutu's and Kuku's gifts of Aloha (Love) for their beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


La'a is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. La'a has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

La'a is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

La'a reflects the divine Mana of the Hawaiian winds.