Friday, October 17, 2014

Hi'iaka, Cradled in the Arms of Pele

No Hi‘iaka nō he inoa ‘eā
In honor of Hi‘iaka

Hi’iaka is Hawaii's patron Goddess. She possesses the power to heal and the truth of vision. Hi'iaka is worshipped for her Hula and many dances have been dedicated just to her. She also is the favorite youngest sister of Pele, Hawaii's famous and feared Volcano Goddess.

It is said that Hi'iaka was born in Tahiti by the great Earth Mother Haumea in the form of an egg. Pele lovingly carried her sister in her armpit on the long canoe ride from Tahiti to Hawaii. Hi'iaka is therefore often called Hi’iaka i ka poli o Pele, which means “cradled in the armpit of Pele”. At long last they reached Pele's new home on Kilauea Volcano on the Big Island. There Pele nurtured Hi’iaka in the beautiful Ohia forest until she hatched.

Goddess Pele creates the land with molten fiery hot lava. Hi’iaka blesses the land with rain and creates soil, trees and life with her healing Mana (spiritual energy). Together the sister Goddesses ensure that the growth and life of the land continues.

Hi'iaka's beloved Ohia Tree is the first form of life to grow directly out of the hardened black lava. It signals the completion of one cycle and illuminates a new beginning. Hi'iaka lives in a sacred grove of Ohia trees where she spends her days dancing with the Akuas (spirits) of the forest.

One famous legend tells of Hi'iaka's precarious journey to Kaua'i where she was sent by her sister to bring back Pele's lover, Lohi'au. Pele asked Hi'aka to be back within 40 days and promised to protect her sacred Lehua groves and best friend Hopoe during that time.
But Hi'iaka encountered many obstacles on her journey: The landscape was treacherous, the weather hostile and deadly Mo'o lizards attempted to trap her. When she finally reached Lohi'au's home on Kaua'i, he had committed suicide because of his longing for Pele. Hi'iaka was able to revive him with the power of her chanting and prayers.
Hi'iaka was armed with some of Pele's Mana (powers), but she was still unable to complete the mission in 40 days. Pele, fearing that Hiʻiaka had betrayed her and was keeping her handsome lover for herself, was enraged. She destroyed Hiʻiaka's sacred Lehua groves and killed her friend Hopoe, turning her into stone.
When Hiʻiaka returned, seeing her friend dead and her forest ravaged, she took revenge on Pele and made love to Lohiau right on the edge of the crater where Pele was sure to see them. Furiously, Pele covered the couple in waves of fiery hot lava. Hiʻiaka was unharmed, but Lohiau died. Hiʻiaka brought him back to life for the second time.
Pele regretted her actions toward her beloved sister's Lehua groves and best friend. She decided to let Lohiau choose who he wanted to be with.
During their long and dangerous journey from Kaua'i, Lohi'au had come to love and greatly admire Hi'iaka for her bravery, loyalty, kindness and beauty. He chose her for his wife and took her back to Kaua'i with him.

Hi'iaka connects our hearts and actions with Aloha (love). The reality of our outer lives is often the result of what we carry in our hearts. Hi'iaka teaches us to focus on our higher purpose. If you choose wisely, you will grow, flourish and blossom in unlimited possibilities.

Goddess Hi'iaka's divine Mana inspired the creation of Menehune Dolls, Hi'iaka and Lohi'au.


Hi'iaka and Lohi'au
Birth Date: ʻOkakopa 15, 2014 (10/15/14)



Onaona i Kahala me Ka Lehua
He Hale Lehua no ia na Ka noe
Aloha e, Aloha e

(Fragrant with the breath of Hala and Lehua
This is the sight I long to see
Greetings, Greetings)

The sacred drumming of the Ipu (gourd) echoes across the 'Aina (land) as Hi'iaka and Lohi'au dance and chant with the Akuas (spirits) of the Ohia Forest.
The Menehune Ohana (family) watches in awe as the harmony of Ipu, Hula and chant attunes them to spirit and gladdens their heart.



Hi'iaka and Lohi'au connect our hearts and actions with Aloha (love). Focus on your higher purpose, choose wisely and you will grow, flourish and blossom in unlimited possibilities.





Hi'iaka and Lohi'au are Menehune Mahoes (twins) and inseparable. Tutu (grandmother) is their Kumu Hula (Hula Teacher). She taught them the powerful chants and movements of the Hula.
Tutu sewed Hi'iaka's dress and Lohi'au's Malu (loincloth). She crocheted matching shoes and panties for her Mo’opunas (grandchildren). Tutu also wove Lohi'au's Ti Leaf lei and Hi'iaka's yellow feather Haku (head lei) and wrist leis. In Hawaii Ti Leafs are used for protection and purification. The Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine. Last Tutu stuck a beautiful red Lehua flower behing Hi'iaka's ear. Lehua means 'Flower sacred to the Gods'.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Tutu picked the most beautiful of the Ipus for Lohi'au. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a Ti Leaf lei. It became Lohi'au’s most treasured possession.
All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opunas.

Hi'iaka and Lohi'au are about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Hi'iaka and Lohi'au have tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and belly buttons.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Hi'iaka and Lohi'au spend their days in the sacred Ohia forest playing, dancing and chanting, honoring the Akuas. Often their big sister, Pele, comes down the mountain on the hardened lava flow to join her beloved brother and sister in their delightful games and dances.

Hi'iaka and Lohi'au are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.


Hi'iaka's and Lohi'au's Mana attunes us to the spirit of Aloha.















Sunday, October 5, 2014

He'e Holua, Riding the Waves of Pele

Hawaiian Mountain Surfing

‘Riding the waves of Pele’ refers to the ancient art of lava sledding in Hawaii. In this 2000 year old athletic ritual the natives risked their lives to honor Pele, the mystical Hawaiian Goddess of the Volcanoes.

Standing, laying or sitting on their Holua sleds they would surf the lava of the volcanic slopes reaching over 50 mph. The Holua sled, 12 feet long, 6 inches wide and 4 inches in depth, was carved from native Ohia or Kauila wood. All the ancient Holua slides were built around Heiaus, altars of worship for Pele, the volcano Goddess.

In Hawaiian mythology Pele, the Hawaiian Fire Goddess and Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess were said to have been fierce rivals. One well known Hawaiian legend tells the story of Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess, winning a he’e holua race on Mauna Kea, the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, against the Volcano Goddess Pele. Pele was so angry at being defeated that she threw streams of glowing lava at Poli’ahu who calmly brought down storms of snow and froze the molten rock into place.
Pele surrendered and never again stepped onto Poli’ahu’s territory on Mauna Kea. The power of fire was pacified by Poli’ahu’s calmness.

Hawaii’s sacred sledding inspired the creation of Mu, the Menehune Christmas Elf.
Mu’s miniature sled was constructed following the concept of ancient Hawaiian sleds.

Mu, the Menehune Christmas Elf
Birthdate: Kekemapa 24th, 2013 (12/24/13)

“Mele Kalikimaka!” (Merry Christmas)

The sound of Mu’s (Elf) voice echoes through the forest as he zooms down the mountain slopes on his Holua (Hawaiian sled) ringing his Christmas bell. Mu’s Holua is loaded with gifts for his Menehune Ohana (family). There is a basket with the Menehune’s favorite treats, Mai’as (bananas) and a big Kahiki (pineapple), but there also is a box wrapped in tapa cloth (bark cloth) with a big red bow. It holds a secret present, a magical treasure which will fulfill somebody’s most heartfelt desire.

Mu carries a big surprise for you too. Close your eyes, make a wish and get ready to open your magical gift!



Mu is the Menehune’s Christmas Elf. He wears red elf shoes with a matching Santa Claus hat. Mu’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed all these clothes for him. She also crocheted his green shorts and wove her Mana (spiritual energy) into the green Hulu (feather) lei he wears around his hat. In Hawaii the Hulu is believed to link to the divine.
Last she draped a Kukui lei around Mu’s neck to protect her Mo’opuna Kane (grandson) on his dangerous sled rides down Hawaii’s volcanic mountain slopes.
Mu and his Kuku (grandfather) built the Holua together. They carved it out of Hawaiian Kauila wood and tied a bamboo railing with raffia to both sides of the sled. They surrounded the sled with Ti Leaves to assure that Mu will always be save and protected on his Holua.
All these precious things were Mu’s Kupuna’s (grandparents) gift of Aloha (love) to their grandson.




Mu is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Mu has little hands and feet, elf ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.




Mu’s sister, Poli’ahu the Hawaiian Snow Goddess, weaved the basket for her brother and tied a beautiful, big, red bow with a green crystal to it. Mu often visits Poli’ahu and Pueo (Owl) on the top of Mauna Kea, the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. The three of them always have so much fun riding Mu’s Holua down the snow covered slopes of the great mountain.

Mu is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
His Holua is signed and dated. Mu comes with his sled, story and a certificate of authenticity.

Mu brings you the magical Mana of Hawaii.


www.HawaiianCollectibleMenehuneDolls.com






Saturday, September 6, 2014

Hawaiian Halloween, Pala'ai, the Menehune Witch


Creating a miniature Menehune witch combining colors, dress codes and accessories pertaining to Halloween and Hawaii challenged my imagination.
But here she is: Pala'ai, the little Menehune Witch.


Pala'ai (Pumpkin)
Birth Date: ‘Okakopa 31, 2013 (10-31-13)

It’s Halloween in the Menehune village! There is so much excitement in the air!
Pala'ai was born on October 31 and Halloween just is her favorite time of the year. This year, Pala'ai (Pumpkin) is dressed up as a little witch. Carrying her Ipu Pu (pumpkin), she zooms on her broom to the Menehune Ohana (family) casting blessings and magical spells of Aloha (love) upon everyone she meets. Pala'ai’s happiness is contagious and in no time all the Menehunes wear big smiles on their faces, sharing their favorite Halloween treats, mai’as (bananas) and kahikis (pineapple), with each other.

Pala'ai’s magical Mana (spiritual energy) casts blessings of love and joy.

Pala'ai’s Tutu (grandmother) made her Halloween costume. She crocheted the witch’s hat and decorated it with a green feather Haku and an orange pompon on the tip. Tutu sewed a black cape out of silky material held together by a crystal in the front and an orange wraparound skirt with a Hawaiian flower design. She wove another green feather lei which Pala'ai wears around her hips. Tutu crocheted Pala'ai’s pointy black witch’s shoes and decorated the tips with small black pompons. She also crocheted Ipu Pu (pumpkin) and embroidered a face onto him. Then she gave Pala'ai an orange Plumeria flower to put behind her ear and her magical kitchen broom because a witch just has to have a broom.
Pala'ai’s witch costume was Tutu’s gift of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter). Pala'ai loves to wear it. It makes her feel like a real little Hawaiian Menehune witch.


Pala'ai is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Pala'ai has tiny little hands and feet, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Pala'ai is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Pala'ai conveys the Aloha spirit of Hawaii.







Sunday, August 24, 2014

Rainbows of Hawaii

O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

Anuenue, the Hawaiian rainbow, is the pathway between dimensions in Hawaiian mythology. The rainbow was often associated with messages from the spirit world and death. Death was believed to be a transformation of the soul where it began to move between the earth and upper realms of the ancestors. The soul then became a god who was able to enjoy earthly abundance. The rainbow was the path the Gods used to travel from Nu'umealani, 'the sacred raised land of the heavenly ones', down to earth.

The rainbow is a symbol of transformation and pathways to the heavens of raised consciousness and enlightenment. The clouds and shadows in nature and within ourselves are illuminated by the rainbow. The rainbow shines light upon all that interferes with unity and wholeness.

O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

'Ula' means flame, 'Inoa' means name. The rainbow ignites the spiritual in your name. It refers to those who are related by the fire in their spirits, which burns for peace, harmony, justice and love of the earth. In the heat of this fire, Rainbow Warriors fight fear and doubt pursuing the rainbow path. The ancient wisdom of the rainbow can be found in all cultures and is actively used to eternalize peace and harmony in the world. Rainbow Warriors teach this ancient wisdom to those who have forgotten.
Clouds, thunder, lightning and rain precede the shining beauty of every rainbow. As you go through transformations and move on to new realms of existence, the rainbow lights the way to your pot of gold.

Anuenue,the Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess, is a messenger of the Gods. Also called, the Beauty of Manoa, she was born of the divine wind and rain of Manoa Valley on Oahu. Since ancient times the valley has been regarded as “the royal palace of rainbows,” where Anuenue, the beautiful Rainbow Maiden, can be seen playing wherever the light of sun touches the misty rain. Anuenue is so beautiful that a rainbow follows her wherever she goes.
Anuenue was raised by her grandmother Waka in a secret forest clearing in Manoa Valley. Waka surrounded her Mo'opuna Wahine (granddaughter) in a fine mist to guard her maidenhood until she would be ready to marry a man of highest royalty. There Anuenue lives up to this day.
Her 'I’iwi bird guardians bring her gifts of Ohia Lehua blossom as Anuenue watches over the Aina (sacred land). 

Rainbows are seen so frequently in Hawaii, that the Islands are often called 'the Rainbow State'.
To the ancient Hawaiians rainbows were a symbol of good luck and prosperity. Babies destined to become great chieftains were born with rainbows over their homes and accompanied by rainbows throughout their lives. 

Rainbow Warrior

Rainbows were such an important part of Hawaiians culture that they were often portrayed in petroglyphs. A woman with an arch or rainbow signifies she is wise, honored and respected. A man and a rainbow in a petroglyph is interpreted as the keeper of the land and its people. Such petroglyphs are found in the Big Island’s lava fields and in the sacred Iao Valley of Maui.

Some natives have said that each color of the rainbow represents a Goddess and thinking of that color will bring about the element associated with it:

-White represents the element of water and the Goddess Hina who bestows knowledge and awareness.

-Earth Goddess Haumea promises freedom and release. She bears the color red. A stone is used as her element.

-Orange is for the Volcano Goddess Pele who infuses energy and focus. She commands the fire element.

-Yellow is for the Goddess Hi’iaka who gives presence and purpose. Her element is the wind.

-Purple is for Goddess Uli, who endows success and effectiveness. People are her element.

-Green is for the element of plants and Goddess Laka, who showers love and compassion.

-Blue is for the Goddess Kapo, the giver of power and ability. An animal is her element.

The rainbow represents the bridge that connects us to the source.


Magical Menehune girl Anuenue was created in honor of the beautiful Hawaiian rainbow and its inspiring spiritual significance.


Anuenue, Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess
Birth Date: 'Aukake 24, 2014 (08-24-14)


O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

The gentle drum of the Ipu (gourd) echoes through the Ohia Forest as a beautiful rainbow slowly approaches the Menehune village. Full of excitement, the Menehunes run to the gathering place. Anuenue is coming! She is their bringer of good luck and prosperity.
Anuenue is named after the Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess. Anuenue is so lovely that a rainbow follows her wherever she goes. One of the most beautiful rainbows just couldn't let go and imbued itself onto her dress.


Believe in your dreams and follow Anuenue on the rainbow path. Like the rainbow, her Mana (spiritual energy) illuminates the way to your pot of gold.




Anuenue's head is surrounded by a halo of fragrant Maile and sacred yellow Lehua Blossoms. Crystal bracelets adorn her wrists and the flower on her dress. 
Maile is the lei of eternal love. Lehua means "Flower sacred to the Gods" in the Hawaiian language. Crystals inspire spiritual strength, unity and love.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Anuenue’s Tutu (grandmother) picked the most beautiful of the Ipus. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a purple crystal and cord.
It was her sacred gift of 
Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter) and became Anuenue’s most treasured possession.


Anuenue is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All of Anuenue’s accessories were individually handcrafted.
Guarded by the Tiki God of Love, Anuenue chants softly to the sound of her Ipu worshipping the enchanting Ohia Forest.

Anuenue is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by 
Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with the Tiki God of Love, her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Anuenue is the bearer of good luck and prosperity.














Monday, August 11, 2014

Poli'ahu, Hawaiian Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea


In Hawaiian mythology, Poli’ahu is the Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea, the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. In the Hawaiian language Poli’ahu means “caress”.
The Snow Goddess Poli’ahu gently caresses the summit of Mauna Kea with her pure white cloak in the winter and beautifies the mountain with her pink and gold cloak in the summer.
Translated from the Hawaiian language Mauna Kea means “the White Mountain”. The mountains of the island were always sacred to the Hawaiians, and Mauna Kea is the most sacred of all. In ancient times the law allowed only high-ranking tribal chiefs to visit its peak.
The fascinating summit of the dormant volcano is at 13,803 feet the highest point in the State of Hawaii. Measured from its base on the ocean floor, it rises over 33,000 feet, making it the tallest mountain on earth. Mauna Kea last erupted about 4000 years ago.
This majestic mountain is only about one million years old. In the past glaciers covered the summit of Mauna Kea. Glacial features and a few rock glaciers have remained on the summit until today.
Mauna Kea’s high altitude, dry environment, and stable airflow make it one of the best sites in the world for astronomical observation. The world’s largest collection of international astronomical observatories is located on the summit of Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea also is home to many endangered plants and animals, including the Wekiu bug, the Palila (a rare bird), and the Mauna Kea Silversword.


Lake Waiau


Lake Waiau, located on the summit platform of Mauna Kea, is one of the highest elevated lakes on the planet. Lake Waiau is a sacred site. Ancient Hawaiians believed that the Lake was a bottomless portal to the spirit world. Its water was considered pure water of the gods.
According to Hawaiian beliefs, water captured in the piko (the center) is considered pure and sacred. The water of Lake Waiau is worshipped as the most sacred. In ancient time, a chief would throw the umbilical cord of their first son into the lake to reserve the place for the child's afterlife as a chief.
People believe in the immense powers of Lake Waiau up to this day and visit it to perform rituals or collect the water for good health.

In Hawaiian mythology Pele, the Hawaiian Fire Goddess and Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess were said to have been fierce rivals. One well known Hawaiian legend tells the story of Poli’ahu winning a race against the Volcano goddess Pele at the Hawaiian sledding sport called “he’eholua”. Pele was so angry at being defeated that she threw streams of glowing lava at Poli’ahu who calmly brought down storms of snow and froze the molten rock into place. Pele surrendered and never again stepped onto Poli’ahu’s territory on Mauna Kea. The power of fire was pacified by Poli’ahu’s calmness.

The legend of the Hawaiian Snow Goddess inspired the creation of the miniature Magical Hawaiian Menehune Poli'ahu.


Birthdate: ʻAukake 10, 2014 (08/10/14)

Poli’ahu is named after the Hawaiian Snow Goddess who resides on the summit of Mauna Kea (White Mountain), the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Poli’ahu’s name means caress. Her serene, gentle Mana (spiritual energy) is like the caress of a soft, pure, white snow blanket. 

Connect with Poli’ahu’s Mana and learn how to be victorious over all of life’s challenges by caressing them with tenderness and stillness.

Pueo, the Hawaiian Owl, is Poli’ahu’s Aumakua (ancestral spirit) and her loyal companion. Pueo appears whenever Poli'ahu calls on her but she also often comes on her own at important times of change, when she knows that her advise is needed. Pueo always lands on Poli'ahu’s left hand where she greets her with love and respect. Pueo gently chirps sweet songs and secret messages in Poli’ahu’s ear, guiding her even deeper into her place of inner stillness. 


Like the Hawaiian Snow Goddess, Poli’ahu is dressed in a white dress symbolizing a mantle of snow. It is held together by a small crystal much like the icicles on the summit of Mauna Kea. 
Poli’ahu's Tutu (grandmother) wove her Aloha (love) and Mana into Poli'ahu's Feather Haku (head lei) and crystal bracelets.

 Poli’ahu’s coconut cradle also wears a feather lei. 

Tutu sewed white cotton bedding for the cradle and crocheted white panties and matching shoes for Poli'ahu. Feathers and crystals inspire spiritual strength, unity and love. They are believed to link to the divine. All this were Tutu’s sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Poli'ahu is about 3.5” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Poli'ahu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. 
Pueo is made out of brown synthetic fur and feathers. Her body is wired for flexibility. The eyes are black crystals. The beak is hand molded out of clay.
The hand carved, sanded and polished coconut for Poli'ahu's cradle was selected from palm trees at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

A big crystal snowflake hangs in the center of the cradle. Poli’ahu and Pueo delight in watching it sparkle in the moonlight as they join each other in their dream worlds.

Poli'ahu and Pueo are one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their cradle, story and a certificate of authenticity.

Poli’ahu conveys the strength of inner stillness.





Saturday, August 2, 2014

Sacred Hula, the Soul of Hawaii


Aloha Mai 
 I come with love.

Hula is a highly ritualized Hawaiian dance expressing praise and worship to the Aloha spirit of Hawaii. The ancient Hawaiian Hula is a way of life linking humanity to spirit. It teaches about nature, respect and all that is sacred. 

Hula is referred to as the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people.

Many Kumu Hulas (Hula teachers) and Haumanas (students) dedicate their life to the art of Hula. Purification, rituals, and ceremonies have always been a prelude to this sacred dance which expresses love and humbleness. The beautiful movements tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and much more.
Chants give life to Hula. Chants possess great Mana (spiritual energy) through the power of words.

Ke Ao Nani 
(The Beautiful World) 

I luna la i luna
Na manu o ka lewa

I lalo la i lalo
Na pua o ka honua

I uka la i uka
Na ulu la`au

I kai la i kai
Na i`a o ka moana

Ha`ina mai ka puana
A he nani ke ao nei

He inoa no kamali`i
______

Up above, above
Birds of the heavens

Below, below
Flowers of the earth

In the mountains, mountains
The forests

In the sea, the sea
Fishes of the ocean

Tell the refrain
Of the beautiful world

In the name of children

(Nona Beamer Collection)


Dancers often accompany themselves using a variety of traditional Hawaiian instruments which add the thrill of percussive sound to the Hula.
Vibrant colored feather gourds, called Ulu'uli, enhance the excitement of the dance.

Uli'uli


The Pu`ili dancing sticks are split bamboo rattles which intensify the rhythm of the hula.

Pu'ili

Together, the chant, the dance, and the instruments contain a magic that fills both, dancers and audience, with the spirit of Aloha.

The spiritual power of this beautiful dance inspired the creation of the Menehune twins 
Uli'uli and Pu'ili.
Hula dancers follow strict traditions when gathering the plants and materials for their costumes and instruments. Uliuli’s and Pili’s miniature costumes and accessories follow these traditions as closely as possible. A lot of love and energy went into their creation.

Eventually Uli'uli and Pu'ili became alive with the magic of Hula.


Uli'uli and Pu'ili
(Feather Gourd & Dancing Stick) 
Birth Date: ʻAukake 1, 2014 (08/01/14)

Aloha Mai 
I come with love.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili dance the ancient Hawaiian Kahiko Hula in unity and harmony.
The beautiful movements of their hands and bodies tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and the Menehune Ohana (family). Uli'uli’s traditional feather gourds add sound and excitement to their dance. Pu`ili dancing sticks enhance the rhythm of their dance.

Uli'uli’s and Pu'ili’s Hula honors the miracle of creation.
Join them in their celebration of life’s joys and abundance.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili are Menehune Twins. Tutu (grandmother) is their Kumu Hula (Hula Teacher). She taught them the powerful movements of the Kahiko Hula.
Uli'uli is named after the Hawaiian Uli'uli (feather gourd). Tutu and Uli'uli made the feather gourds out of wood and bright red and yellow feathers. Tutu and Pu'ili carved his dancing sticks out of bamboo. Tutu blessed everything with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. The gourds and dancing sticks are sacred now. They were created for Uli'uli and Pu'ili and only they are allowed to touch them.
Tutu also hand crafted the traditional Ti leaf skirt and Malu (loincloth) for her Mo’opunas (grandchildren). In Hawaii Ti Leafs are used for protection and purification.
Tutu sewed a red top for Uli'uili and crocheted matching red panties.
She wove a yellow feather cape for Pu'ili and green feather Hakus (head leis), wrist and ankle leis for both of the twins. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine.
All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opunas.


Uli'uli and Pu'ili are about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. 


The bodies are made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Uli'uli and Pu'ili have tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and belly buttons.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.


Uli'uli's and Pu'ili's Hula teaches about all that is sacred.




Sunday, July 27, 2014

The Hawaiian Kukui Nut Tree, Spirit Revealing Itself

In ancient Hawaii the silvery glow of the Kukui Nut Tree represented light, hope, and renewal.

It was believed that a Kukui Nut Tree planted in front of the house revealed the owners spirit.
Because of its beauty and many uses the Kukui, also known as the Candlenut tree, became the state tree of Hawaii.

Kukui was believed to be one of the kino laus or physical manifestations of Lono, the Hawaiian god of agriculture and fertility. Lono appeared when abundance was ready to be harvested.

In old Hawaii Kukui nut leis were worn by the Ali’I (royalty) to honor the life-giving force of Lono and to show their social status. For them it was like wearing a lei of light providing hope, healing and protection. Hawaiians also used their Kukui seed leis as prayer beads, over time increasing their beauty by filling them with their Mana (spiritual energy).


Kukui Nut Lei

Kukui nuts were used for light, navigation, medicinal, spiritual and many other purposes. Kukui nut oil provided light for the first Hawaiian torches. The oil was and still is used for massages, moisturizing the skin, and many other healing benefits. Early Hawaiians used Kukui nut candles were to keep track of time.

Kukui symbolizes inner light, hope and renewal, spirit revealing itself. The spiritual significance of the Kukui Nut Tree inspired the creation of Kukui, a Hawaiian Menehune Angel.


Kukui (Inner Light), the Guardian Angel

Kukui’s Mana (spiritual energy) radiates the power of unconditional Aloha (love). Kukui is a Hawaiian Menehune guardian angel. She is named after the Hawaiian Kukui Nut Tree which represents spirit revealing itself.
Kukui’s home is Lanikeha, the high sky. The heavenly light of Kukui’s candle illuminates the paths of the Menehune’s lives on earth.
The Menehunes know Kukui always watches over them enlightening their lives with her angelic presence. All they have to do is call and Kukui appears offering her wisdom and guidance.
Sometimes she allows them a glance at the healing glow of her heavenly Kukui Nut candle or a glimpse of her angelic white feather wings passing by to remind them how brightly the Aloha spirit is shining from their own souls.


Welcome Kukui as your guardian angel! She is devoted to protecting and guiding you on your life’s journey.


Kukui's yellow Hulu (feather) Haku (head lei) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. A white and yellow Plumeria flower adorns her beautiful long black hair.
Kukui wears a beige colored dress with a big yellow and orange Plumeria flower in the front yellow crocheted panties and matching shoes.
A sparkling crystal adorns the center of the flower and the tops of her shoes. She is holding a small Kukui nut with a candle in her hands. Her angel wings are crafted out of real white feathers.

Kukui is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kukui has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.

Kukui often rests in the serene Hawaiian Ohia forest, worshipping the beautiful world around her. She never tires of rejoicing in the abundant splendor of nature.

Kukui is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She is a collector’s item bringing you the spiritual power of Hawaii. Kukui comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.


Kukui’s Mana (spiritual energy) radiates unconditional Aloha.

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