Sunday, August 24, 2014

Rainbows of Hawaii

O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

Anuenue, the Hawaiian rainbow, is the pathway between dimensions in Hawaiian mythology. The rainbow was often associated with messages from the spirit world and death. Death was believed to be a transformation of the soul where it began to move between the earth and upper realms of the ancestors. The soul then became a god who was able to enjoy earthly abundance. The rainbow was the path the Gods used to travel from Nu'umealani, 'the sacred raised land of the heavenly ones', down to earth.

The rainbow is a symbol of transformation and pathways to the heavens of raised consciousness and enlightenment. The clouds and shadows in nature and within ourselves are illuminated by the rainbow. The rainbow shines light upon all that interferes with unity and wholeness.

O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

'Ula' means flame, 'Inoa' means name. The rainbow ignites the spiritual in your name. It refers to those who are related by the fire in their spirits, which burns for peace, harmony, justice and love of the earth. In the heat of this fire, Rainbow Warriors fight fear and doubt pursuing the rainbow path. The ancient wisdom of the rainbow can be found in all cultures and is actively used to eternalize peace and harmony in the world. Rainbow Warriors teach this ancient wisdom to those who have forgotten.
Clouds, thunder, lightning and rain precede the shining beauty of every rainbow. As you go through transformations and move on to new realms of existence, the rainbow lights the way to your pot of gold.

Anuenue,the Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess, is a messenger of the Gods. Also called, the Beauty of Manoa, she was born of the divine wind and rain of Manoa Valley on Oahu. Since ancient times the valley has been regarded as “the royal palace of rainbows,” where Anuenue, the beautiful Rainbow Maiden, can be seen playing wherever the light of sun touches the misty rain. Anuenue is so beautiful that a rainbow follows her wherever she goes.
Anuenue was raised by her grandmother Waka in a secret forest clearing in Manoa Valley. Waka surrounded her Mo'opuna Wahine (granddaughter) in a fine mist to guard her maidenhood until she would be ready to marry a man of highest royalty. There Anuenue lives up to this day.
Her 'I’iwi bird guardians bring her gifts of Ohia Lehua blossom as Anuenue watches over the Aina (sacred land). 

Rainbows are seen so frequently in Hawaii, that the Islands are often called 'the Rainbow State'.
To the ancient Hawaiians rainbows were a symbol of good luck and prosperity. Babies destined to become great chieftains were born with rainbows over their homes and accompanied by rainbows throughout their lives. 

Rainbow Warrior

Rainbows were such an important part of Hawaiians culture that they were often portrayed in petroglyphs. A woman with an arch or rainbow signifies she is wise, honored and respected. A man and a rainbow in a petroglyph is interpreted as the keeper of the land and its people. Such petroglyphs are found in the Big Island’s lava fields and in the sacred Iao Valley of Maui.

Some natives have said that each color of the rainbow represents a Goddess and thinking of that color will bring about the element associated with it:

-White represents the element of water and the Goddess Hina who bestows knowledge and awareness.

-Earth Goddess Haumea promises freedom and release. She bears the color red. A stone is used as her element.

-Orange is for the Volcano Goddess Pele who infuses energy and focus. She commands the fire element.

-Yellow is for the Goddess Hi’iaka who gives presence and purpose. Her element is the wind.

-Purple is for Goddess Uli, who endows success and effectiveness. People are her element.

-Green is for the element of plants and Goddess Laka, who showers love and compassion.

-Blue is for the Goddess Kapo, the giver of power and ability. An animal is her element.

The rainbow represents the bridge that connects us to the source.


Magical Menehune girl Anuenue was created in honor of the beautiful Hawaiian rainbow and its inspiring spiritual significance.


Anuenue, Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess
Birth Date: 'Aukake 24, 2014 (08-24-14)


O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

The gentle drum of the Ipu (gourd) echoes through the Ohia Forest as a beautiful rainbow slowly approaches the Menehune village. Full of excitement, the Menehunes run to the gathering place. Anuenue is coming! She is their bringer of good luck and prosperity.
Anuenue is named after the Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess. Anuenue is so lovely that a rainbow follows her wherever she goes. One of the most beautiful rainbows just couldn't let go and imbued itself onto her dress.


Believe in your dreams and follow Anuenue on the rainbow path. Like the rainbow, her Mana (spiritual energy) illuminates the way to your pot of gold.




Anuenue's head is surrounded by a halo of fragrant Maile and sacred yellow Lehua Blossoms. Crystal bracelets adorn her wrists and the flower on her dress. 
Maile is the lei of eternal love. Lehua means "Flower sacred to the Gods" in the Hawaiian language. Crystals inspire spiritual strength, unity and love.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Anuenue’s Tutu (grandmother) picked the most beautiful of the Ipus. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a purple crystal and cord.
It was her sacred gift of 
Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter) and became Anuenue’s most treasured possession.


Anuenue is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All of Anuenue’s accessories were individually handcrafted.
Guarded by the Tiki God of Love, Anuenue chants softly to the sound of her Ipu worshipping the enchanting Ohia Forest.

Anuenue is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by 
Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with the Tiki God of Love, her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Anuenue is the bearer of good luck and prosperity.














Monday, August 11, 2014

Poli'ahu, Hawaiian Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea


In Hawaiian mythology, Poli’ahu is the Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea, the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. In the Hawaiian language Poli’ahu means “caress”.
The Snow Goddess Poli’ahu gently caresses the summit of Mauna Kea with her pure white cloak in the winter and beautifies the mountain with her pink and gold cloak in the summer.
Translated from the Hawaiian language Mauna Kea means “the White Mountain”. The mountains of the island were always sacred to the Hawaiians, and Mauna Kea is the most sacred of all. In ancient times the law allowed only high-ranking tribal chiefs to visit its peak.
The fascinating summit of the dormant volcano is at 13,803 feet the highest point in the State of Hawaii. Measured from its base on the ocean floor, it rises over 33,000 feet, making it the tallest mountain on earth. Mauna Kea last erupted about 4000 years ago.
This majestic mountain is only about one million years old. In the past glaciers covered the summit of Mauna Kea. Glacial features and a few rock glaciers have remained on the summit until today.
Mauna Kea’s high altitude, dry environment, and stable airflow make it one of the best sites in the world for astronomical observation. The world’s largest collection of international astronomical observatories is located on the summit of Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea also is home to many endangered plants and animals, including the Wekiu bug, the Palila (a rare bird), and the Mauna Kea Silversword.


Lake Waiau


Lake Waiau, located on the summit platform of Mauna Kea, is one of the highest elevated lakes on the planet. Lake Waiau is a sacred site. Ancient Hawaiians believed that the Lake was a bottomless portal to the spirit world. Its water was considered pure water of the gods.
According to Hawaiian beliefs, water captured in the piko (the center) is considered pure and sacred. The water of Lake Waiau is worshipped as the most sacred. In ancient time, a chief would throw the umbilical cord of their first son into the lake to reserve the place for the child's afterlife as a chief.
People believe in the immense powers of Lake Waiau up to this day and visit it to perform rituals or collect the water for good health.

In Hawaiian mythology Pele, the Hawaiian Fire Goddess and Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess were said to have been fierce rivals. One well known Hawaiian legend tells the story of Poli’ahu winning a race against the Volcano goddess Pele at the Hawaiian sledding sport called “he’eholua”. Pele was so angry at being defeated that she threw streams of glowing lava at Poli’ahu who calmly brought down storms of snow and froze the molten rock into place. Pele surrendered and never again stepped onto Poli’ahu’s territory on Mauna Kea. The power of fire was pacified by Poli’ahu’s calmness.

The legend of the Hawaiian Snow Goddess inspired the creation of the miniature Magical Hawaiian Menehune Poli'ahu.


Birthdate:  ĽAukake 10, 2014 (08/10/14)

Poli’ahu is named after the Hawaiian Snow Goddess who resides on the summit of Mauna Kea (White Mountain), the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Poli’ahu’s name means caress. Her serene, gentle Mana (spiritual energy) is like the caress of a soft, pure, white snow blanket. 

Connect with Poli’ahu’s Mana and learn how to be victorious over all of life’s challenges by caressing them with tenderness and stillness.

Pueo, the Hawaiian Owl, is Poli’ahu’s Aumakua (ancestral spirit) and her loyal companion. Pueo appears whenever Poli'ahu calls on her but she also often comes on her own at important times of change, when she knows that her advise is needed. Pueo always lands on Poli'ahu’s left hand where she greets her with love and respect. Pueo gently chirps sweet songs and secret messages in Poli’ahu’s ear, guiding her even deeper into her place of inner stillness. 


Like the Hawaiian Snow Goddess, Poli’ahu is dressed in a white dress symbolizing a mantle of snow. It is held together by a small crystal much like the icicles on the summit of Mauna Kea. 
Poli’ahu's Tutu (grandmother) wove her Aloha (love) and Mana into Poli'ahu's Feather Haku (head lei) and crystal bracelets.

 Poli’ahu’s coconut cradle also wears a feather lei. 

Tutu sewed white cotton bedding for the cradle and crocheted white panties and matching shoes for Poli'ahu. Feathers and crystals inspire spiritual strength, unity and love. They are believed to link to the divine. All this were Tutu’s sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Poli'ahu is about 3.5” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Poli'ahu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. 
Pueo is made out of brown synthetic fur and feathers. Her body is wired for flexibility. The eyes are black crystals. The beak is hand molded out of clay.
The hand carved, sanded and polished coconut for Poli'ahu's cradle was selected from palm trees at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

A big crystal snowflake hangs in the center of the cradle. Poli’ahu and Pueo delight in watching it sparkle in the moonlight as they join each other in their dream worlds.

Poli'ahu and Pueo are one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their cradle, story and a certificate of authenticity.

Poli’ahu conveys the strength of inner stillness.





Saturday, August 2, 2014

Sacred Hula, the Soul of Hawaii


Aloha Mai 
 I come with love.

Hula is a highly ritualized Hawaiian dance expressing praise and worship to the Aloha spirit of Hawaii. The ancient Hawaiian Hula is a way of life linking humanity to spirit. It teaches about nature, respect and all that is sacred. 

Hula is referred to as the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people.

Many Kumu Hulas (Hula teachers) and Haumanas (students) dedicate their life to the art of Hula. Purification, rituals, and ceremonies have always been a prelude to this sacred dance which expresses love and humbleness. The beautiful movements tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and much more.
Chants give life to Hula. Chants possess great Mana (spiritual energy) through the power of words.

Ke Ao Nani 
(The Beautiful World) 

I luna la i luna
Na manu o ka lewa

I lalo la i lalo
Na pua o ka honua

I uka la i uka
Na ulu la`au

I kai la i kai
Na i`a o ka moana

Ha`ina mai ka puana
A he nani ke ao nei

He inoa no kamali`i
______

Up above, above
Birds of the heavens

Below, below
Flowers of the earth

In the mountains, mountains
The forests

In the sea, the sea
Fishes of the ocean

Tell the refrain
Of the beautiful world

In the name of children

(Nona Beamer Collection)


Dancers often accompany themselves using a variety of traditional Hawaiian instruments which add the thrill of percussive sound to the Hula.
Vibrant colored feather gourds, called Ulu'uli, enhance the excitement of the dance.

Uli'uli


The Pu`ili dancing sticks are split bamboo rattles which intensify the rhythm of the hula.

Pu'ili

Together, the chant, the dance, and the instruments contain a magic that fills both, dancers and audience, with the spirit of Aloha.

The spiritual power of this beautiful dance inspired the creation of the Menehune twins 
Uli'uli and Pu'ili.
Hula dancers follow strict traditions when gathering the plants and materials for their costumes and instruments. Uliuli’s and Pili’s miniature costumes and accessories follow these traditions as closely as possible. A lot of love and energy went into their creation.

Eventually Uli'uli and Pu'ili became alive with the magic of Hula.


Uli'uli and Pu'ili
(Feather Gourd & Dancing Stick) 
Birth Date:  ĽAukake 1, 2014 (08/01/14)

Aloha Mai 
I come with love.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili dance the ancient Hawaiian Kahiko Hula in unity and harmony.
The beautiful movements of their hands and bodies tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and the Menehune Ohana (family). Uli'uli’s traditional feather gourds add sound and excitement to their dance. Pu`ili dancing sticks enhance the rhythm of their dance.

Uli'uli’s and Pu'ili’s Hula honors the miracle of creation.
Join them in their celebration of life’s joys and abundance.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili are Menehune Twins. Tutu (grandmother) is their Kumu Hula (Hula Teacher). She taught them the powerful movements of the Kahiko Hula.
Uli'uli is named after the Hawaiian Uli'uli (feather gourd). Tutu and Uli'uli made the feather gourds out of wood and bright red and yellow feathers. Tutu and Pu'ili carved his dancing sticks out of bamboo. Tutu blessed everything with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. The gourds and dancing sticks are sacred now. They were created for Uli'uli and Pu'ili and only they are allowed to touch them.
Tutu also hand crafted the traditional Ti leaf skirt and Malu (loincloth) for her Mo’opunas (grandchildren). In Hawaii Ti Leafs are used for protection and purification.
Tutu sewed a red top for Uli'uili and crocheted matching red panties.
She wove a yellow feather cape for Pu'ili and green feather Hakus (head leis), wrist and ankle leis for both of the twins. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine.
All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opunas.


Uli'uli and Pu'ili are about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. 


The bodies are made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Uli'uli and Pu'ili have tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and belly buttons.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.


Uli'uli's and Pu'ili's Hula teaches about all that is sacred.




Sunday, July 27, 2014

The Hawaiian Kukui Nut Tree, Spirit Revealing Itself

In ancient Hawaii the silvery glow of the Kukui Nut Tree represented light, hope, and renewal.

It was believed that a Kukui Nut Tree planted in front of the house revealed the owners spirit.
Because of its beauty and many uses the Kukui, also known as the Candlenut tree, became the state tree of Hawaii.

Kukui was believed to be one of the kino laus or physical manifestations of Lono, the Hawaiian god of agriculture and fertility. Lono appeared when abundance was ready to be harvested.

In old Hawaii Kukui nut leis were worn by the Ali’I (royalty) to honor the life-giving force of Lono and to show their social status. For them it was like wearing a lei of light providing hope, healing and protection. Hawaiians also used their Kukui seed leis as prayer beads, over time increasing their beauty by filling them with their Mana (spiritual energy).


Kukui Nut Lei

Kukui nuts were used for light, navigation, medicinal, spiritual and many other purposes. Kukui nut oil provided light for the first Hawaiian torches. The oil was and still is used for massages, moisturizing the skin, and many other healing benefits. Early Hawaiians used Kukui nut candles were to keep track of time.

Kukui symbolizes inner light, hope and renewal, spirit revealing itself. The spiritual significance of the Kukui Nut Tree inspired the creation of Kukui, a Hawaiian Menehune Angel.


Kukui (Inner Light), the Guardian Angel

Kukui’s Mana (spiritual energy) radiates the power of unconditional Aloha (love). Kukui is a Hawaiian Menehune guardian angel. She is named after the Hawaiian Kukui Nut Tree which represents spirit revealing itself.
Kukui’s home is Lanikeha, the high sky. The heavenly light of Kukui’s candle illuminates the paths of the Menehune’s lives on earth.
The Menehunes know Kukui always watches over them enlightening their lives with her angelic presence. All they have to do is call and Kukui appears offering her wisdom and guidance.
Sometimes she allows them a glance at the healing glow of her heavenly Kukui Nut candle or a glimpse of her angelic white feather wings passing by to remind them how brightly the Aloha spirit is shining from their own souls.


Welcome Kukui as your guardian angel! She is devoted to protecting and guiding you on your life’s journey.


Kukui's yellow Hulu (feather) Haku (head lei) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. A white and yellow Plumeria flower adorns her beautiful long black hair.
Kukui wears a beige colored dress with a big yellow and orange Plumeria flower in the front yellow crocheted panties and matching shoes.
A sparkling crystal adorns the center of the flower and the tops of her shoes. She is holding a small Kukui nut with a candle in her hands. Her angel wings are crafted out of real white feathers.

Kukui is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kukui has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.

Kukui often rests in the serene Hawaiian Ohia forest, worshipping the beautiful world around her. She never tires of rejoicing in the abundant splendor of nature.

Kukui is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She is a collector’s item bringing you the spiritual power of Hawaii. Kukui comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.


Kukui’s Mana (spiritual energy) radiates unconditional Aloha.

www.Etsy.com









Wednesday, July 23, 2014

He'e Nalu, the Hawaiian Art of Surfing


Hawaii is a surfer’s paradise. Volcanic activity, mild weather, and coral reefs create perfect and challenging waves on white, golden, green and black sand beaches. When the surf is up, the surfer’s heart dances with excitement as he eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves. The ancient Hawaiians called this feeling “hopupu”. Surfing means riding the waves with focus and balance, finding the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility. Surfers describe it as the very best feeling in the world.
They share a love for the ocean. It becomes their greatest teacher evoking deep respect, humbleness, and fear. With relaxed alertness the surfer watches the ever changing tide, the swell building or fading, the shape of the wave; until he finds the break and rides one of those big waves home.


Surfing requires intense focus, strength, courage, and grace.



He'e Nalu

The history of surfing in Hawaii goes back to the 4th century A.D. To the ancient Hawaiian people surfing was a spiritual form of art which they integrated into their culture. They called it he’e nalu which means wave sliding. The art of riding the waves was a deeply spiritual skill and ritual in ancient Hawaii. The ceremony began with the creation of the olo (surfboard). After choosing a WiliWili, Ula, or Koa tree, Hawaiians faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. Then they honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish underneath it.
Before entering the great ocean, Hawaiians performed a ceremony of special dances and chants asking for strength, protection, and great surf.
Around 1820, the missionaries prohibited surfing in Hawaii and it became nearly extinct until in 1905 a group of native Hawaiians, led by Duke Kahanamoku, revived surfing on the islands.

Today, surfing in Hawaii has become a way of life.

The magic of surfing inspired the creation of Kai (Ocean), a Miniature Hawaiian Menehune Doll.



Kai (Ocean)

Birth Date: Lulai 21, 2014 (07-21-14)

Kai is named after his best friend and greatest teacher, the ocean. Kai is a Menehune He’e Nalu (surfer) boy. When the surf is up, Kai can’t wait to get into the ocean. His heart dances with Hopupu (excitement) as he eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves.
Kai loves the Pacific Ocean and the surf has been his greatest teacher, evoking deep respect and humbleness within him. He knows that every wave presents a challenge of going with its flow.
Kai watches the waves, feels them inside, and connects to their 
Mana (spiritual energy).
He flies along the sea on his Olo (surfboard), riding the waves with focus and balance, He finds the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility and rides the great wave home. It is the very best feeling in the world.
Surfing is magical; it has become his way of life.


Kai inspires us to surrender to the waves of life with focus and balance, allowing them to safely carry us to our highest goals.


The Honu (Turtle) is Kai's
Aumakua
(guardian spirit). Kai wears a Honu pendant around his neck in honor of his Aumakua. In Hawaii the ancient wisdom of the Honu represents long life, safety, peace, and good luck. Kai always feels protected when he surfs because he knows that his Aumakua is watching over him.
Kai and his Kuku(grandfather) made the Olo (surfboard) together. First they chose the right Hawaiian Wiliwili tree for the board. Before cutting the tree, they faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. They honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish beneath it. The wooden Olo is Kai’s most treasured possession. He always carries it with him, even when he goes to sleep.
Kai’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed his Lava lava (wraparound) with a Honu design. She crocheted his orange swimming trunk and matching shoes. Tutu also wove a Lauhala sun visor to protect Kai from getting sunburned. Last she draped the Honu pendant around his neck and put a golden stud earring in his left ear.
All these things were Tutu’s and Kuku's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo'opuna Kane (grandson).

Kai is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. His body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto his face. Kai has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. His doll stand is a piece of coral from Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Kai is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Kai reflects the spiritual powers of the Hawaiian Waters.





Thursday, June 12, 2014

Magical Powers of Hawaiian Ti Leaves



From ancient Hawaii up to this day the leaves of the Hawaiian Ti plant have been used for spiritual protection, purification and healing. Ti Leaves are sacred to Lono, the Hawaiian god of fertility and Laka, the goddess of Hula.
In ancient Hawaii Ti Leaves symbolized high rank and divine powers. Only the Ali’i (royalty) and Kahunas (high priests) were allowed to wear Ti leaves during their ceremonial rituals to ward off evil spirits and invoke the blessings of the gods.


In Hawaii Ti Leaves were and are still also used for many practical purposes, like wrapping food, making hula skirts and weaving leis.
Many people in Hawaii, me included, plant a Ti Leaf plant on each corner of their house for protection, purification, blessings, and good luck.
Ti Leaves have a very special, intense Mana (spiritual energy). I frequently pick 4 of the beautiful, shiny green leaves. The number four was considered sacred by ancient Hawaiians. Sometimes I surround myself with 4 Ti Leaves during meditation, which creates a feeling of resting within a sacred circle of light. At other times, I put them under certain objects or pictures to invoke protection, purification, blessing or healing.
Carrying a piece of a Ti Leaf on your body is believed to provide protection from negative energies. Wearing a Ti Leaf lei brings good luck. 


Bless your house with the powerful Mana of Ti Leaves! 

They make beautiful decorations and radiate a special feeling of safety and protection throughout the house.
The sacred Hawaiian Ti Leaves inspired the creation of Ti, a Magical Hawaiian Menehune.



Ti 

Birth Date: Lune 12, 2014 (06/12/14) 

Ti wanders happily through the enchanting Ohia forest. His Mana (spiritual energy) connects with the peace and serenity of Hawaii. In silence he communicates with nature honoring the divinity in all living things.
Ti is named after he Hawaiian Ti Plant which invokes spiritual protection, healing and good luck.


Empowered by the Ti Plant and his Ti Leaf torch, Ti's Mana bestows prosperity and blessings of body, mind and spirit. 

Ti’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana into his Ti Leaf Haku (head lei). She sewed his Lavalava (wraparound) and crocheted green underpants. Last she strung and draped a Kukui Nut necklace around his neck. The Kukui Nut represents spirit revealing itself. The necklace blesses and protects Ti. Ti’s Kuku (grandfather) crafted the Ihoiho (torch) out of bamboo and Ti Leaves and fueled it with Kukui Nut oil.
All these things were Tutu’s and Kuku's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo'opuna Kane (grandson).


 

Ti is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. His body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto his face. Ti has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. The Ti Plant is made out of Ohia wood and artificial leaves.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Ti is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
He comes with the Ti Plant, his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Ti brings blessings, healing and prosperity to all who are around him. 


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

'Ihi'ihi, Hawaiian Clover, the Good Luck Charm

Named after the Hawaiian clover, 'Ihi'ihi is a lucky Kamahine (girl). Her Mana (spiritual energy) radiates abundance, good luck and well being.

'Ihi'ihi's gift to you is the beautiful Pu (Conch Shell) she carries.

In Hawaii the Pu is said to attract prosperity, an abundance of wealth, good fortune, and well-being.


'Ihi'ihi's Mana conveys good luck, fortune and well being to all who are around her.