Saturday, August 29, 2015

Nene Goose, Hawaii's State Bird

In the Hawaiian language, Nene means to cherish.


Honored as Hawaii’s state bird, the Nene Goose enhances the life and spirit of Hawaii.
As the world's rarest goose, Nene is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands and considered an endangered species.
Nene is a shy and modest bird who meanders on the Hawaiian Islands carefully selecting leaves, berries and grassblades to eat.

Nene sings a melodious rhythmic song that touches the heart and reaches into the ancestor’s world. 

Gratitude for Nene reminding us of the perfection of nature, inspired the creation of Baby Nene as the Aumakua (guardian spirit) of  Menehune girl Ipu

Ipu (Gourd)
Birthdate: 'Aukake 29, 2015 (8-29-15)

“E Alae!”
(Arise!)

Ipu’s prayers invoke inspiration, protection and wisdom.

In harmony to the sacred beat of the Ipu (gourd), Menehune girl Ipu and Baby Nene (Hawaiian Goose) sing a melodious rhythmic song that touches the heart and reaches into the ancestor’s world. Ipu and Nene are honoring the Akuas (spirits) of the enchanting, secluded mountains in Kau on the Big Island of Hawaii.
Baby Nene waddles along happily. The Nene Goose enhances the life and spirit of Hawaii. Nene means to cherish. She is Ipu’s Aumakua (guardian spirit) and the two of them are inseparable. 
Ipu and Nene are headed to the sacred Heiau (Altar), where Ipu prays and worships the beauty of Hawaii. 

Ipu includes everybody she loves into her Pules (prayers). She prays for peace, harmony, happiness, and abundance. 

Ipu's Tutu (grandmother) sewed her white dress with a big pink Puakenikeni flower in the front She crocheted pink panties and matching shoes and wove a Lauhala sunhat.
Tutu wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha into Ipu's Maile Lei. Maile represents spiritual strength, unity and love. Last Tutu adorned the dress and Ipu's hair with the fragrant, pink Puakenikeni flowers. Ipu is named after the Hawaiian Ipus which grow on a vine. Ipu's Tutu picked the most beautiful one for her beloved Mo'opuna (Granddaughter). She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a crystal. It was her sacred gift of Aloha (Love) to Ipu and became her most treasured possession.

Ipu is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. Nene is about 1” tall. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Ipu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All of Ipu’s and Nene’s accessories were individually handcrafted.

Ipu and Nene are one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Ipu’s Mana attunes us to the spirit of Hawaii.







Friday, August 14, 2015

He'e Nalu, the Hawaiian Art of Surfing


Hawaii is a surfer’s paradise. Volcanic activity, mild weather, and coral reefs create perfect and challenging waves on white, golden, green and black sand beaches. When the surf is up, the surfer’s heart dances with excitement as he eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves. The ancient Hawaiians called this feeling “hopupu”. Surfing means riding the waves with focus and balance, finding the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility. Surfers describe it as the very best feeling in the world.
They share a love for the ocean. It becomes their greatest teacher evoking deep respect, humbleness, and fear. With relaxed alertness the surfer watches the ever changing tide, the swell building or fading, the shape of the wave; until he finds the break and rides one of those big waves home.

Surfing requires intense focus, strength, courage, and grace. 


He'e Nalu

The history of surfing in Hawaii goes back to the 4th century A.D. To the ancient Hawaiian people surfing was a spiritual form of art which they integrated into their culture. They called it he’e nalu which means wave sliding. The art of riding the waves was a deeply spiritual skill and ritual in ancient Hawaii. The ceremony began with the creation of the olo (surfboard). After choosing a WiliWili, Ula, or Koa tree, Hawaiians faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. Then they honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish underneath it.
Before entering the great ocean, Hawaiians performed a ceremony of special dances and chants asking for strength, protection, and great surf.
Around 1820, the missionaries prohibited surfing in Hawaii and it became nearly extinct until in 1905 a group of native Hawaiians, led by Duke Kahanamoku, revived surfing on the islands.

Today, surfing in Hawaii has become a way of life.


The magic of surfing inspired the creation of Iniki (Strong Wind), a Miniature Hawaiian Menehune Doll. 

Iniki (Strong Wind)
Birth Date: 'Aukake 7, 2015 (08-07-15)

Iniki inspires us to surrender to the winds and waves of life with focus and balance, allowing them to safely carry us to our highest goals.

Iniki's best friend and greatest teacher is the ocean. Iniki is a Menehune He’e Nalu (surfer) boy. He is named after the strong winds of the Pacific Ocean.
When the surf is up, Iniki can’t wait to get into the ocean. His heart dances with Hopupu (excitement) as he eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves.
Iniki loves the Pacific Ocean and the surf has been his greatest teacher, evoking deep respect and humbleness within him. He knows that every wave along with the wind presents a challenge of going with its flow. Iniki watches the waves, feels them inside, and connects to their Mana (spiritual energy).
Like the wind, he flies along the sea on his Olo (surfboard), riding the waves with focus and balance, Iniki finds the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility and rides the great wave home. It is the very best feeling in the world. 

Surfing is magical; it has become his way of life!

Iniki's Aumakua (guardian spirit) is Mano, the shark. It is a great honor in Hawaii to have the shark as your Aumakua. Mano evokes leadership, strength, and courage. Iniki always feels protected when he surfs because he knows that his Aumakua is watching over him. In honor of his Aumakua, Iniki wears a necklace with a shark tooth pendant around his neck. Like all the other, cool Menehune surfer boys Iniki also has a small, turquoise earring in his left ear.
Iniki and his Kuku(grandfather) made the Olo (surfboard) together. First they chose the right Hawaiian Wiliwili tree for the board. Before cutting the tree, they faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. They honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish beneath it. The wooden Olo is Iniki’s most treasured possession. He always carries it with him, even when he goes to sleep. 
Iniki’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed his red Lava lava (wraparound) with a white Hibiscus flower design. She crocheted matching turquoise shoes and gave Iniki a head band to keep his hair out of his eyes while he surfs. Last Tutu draped the Mano pendant around his neck and put a turquoise earring in his left ear.
All these things were Tutu’s and Kuku's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo'opuna Kane (grandson).


Iniki is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. His body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto his face. Iniki has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. His doll stand is a white piece of coral from Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


Iniki is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Iniki reflects the spiritual powers of the Hawaiian Winds and Waters.

www.Etsy.com


Saturday, July 25, 2015

Pele, Hawaiian Volcano Goddess and her Po'ikis


Recently one of my customers asked me if I could make a male partner for Alohi, an Aloha Doll Ornament she had previously purchased from me.
I created Koko (Hawaiian Blood) and put him next to the new Pele doll, which I had also just completed. Instantly I thought: "This is too precious! They cannot be separated!"
So I made another little male doll, identical to Koko but with a different facial expression. I named him Piko (Crown) and put him next to Pele and Koko, and had the same thought again: " This is too precious! They cannot be separated!"

That is how Koko and Piko became Pele's Po'ikis (little brothers).


The creation of Pele and her Po'ikis was a delightfully intuitive experience.


Pele, Hawaiian Volcano Goddess
and her Po'ikis (Little Brothers)
Koko and Piko

Birth Date: Lulai 24, 2015 (07/24/15)

Ma’ema’e ke ‘ala e holo ala
E ala mai, E naue mai, E noke mai e

Clear the path to move on
Awake, Move, Persevere


Pele's and her Po'iki's presence inspires us to awake, move forward and persevere, to live in faith with intention, determination and courage.

With boundless energy Koko (Hawaiian Blood) and Piko (Crown) race down the hill as fast as they can go. All the while laughing, playing, chanting and drumming their Ipus (gourds), the Po'ikis (little brothers) can't wait to announce the arrival of their big sister Pele to the Menehune Ohana (family).
Excited by all the commotion, the Menehunes hurry to welcome and embrace their beloved little Ma Hoes (twins). Koko and Piko are just delightful. They chatter happily about Pele's coming and all the magnificent stories she will tell.

Aloha e Pele! (Greetings, Pele!)
The Menehunes clap their hands, jumping up and down with excitement as soon as Pele emerges from the sacred Ohia forest with her abundant black hair cascading down her back like the lava flow on the mountain slope.
Pele always brings the most fascinating news about the flaming spirit of Hawaii’s Volcano Goddess hurling fiery ribbons of lava down the mountain slopes, giving birth to new rock formations and land.
As a gift and blessing Pele offers you a flame of Kilauea Volcano in a black lava bowl. The flame embodies the light of spirit, knowledge and life. 

Pele offers her strength and passion to remind us that life’s fiery eruptions and emotional upheavals often clear the path for positive transformations.


Gifted with a passionate spirit, little Menehune girl Pele was named after Hawaii’s Fire Goddess.

Koko means 'blood' in Hawaii and represents the Aka (umbilical) cord that connects us to the Wao Akua (realm of the Gods), Aumakuas (ancestral spirits) and the ‘Aina (land).
In Hawaii the essence of the center of knowledge and wisdom are Pikos (crowns or summits). Piko is named after the crown piko which is soft when we are born and connects us with Aumakua (ancestral spirits). 

Pele’s, Koko's and Piko's Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into Pele's red feather Haku (head lei) and wrist leis and the green feather Hakus and ankle leis for the twins. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Tutu picked the most beautiful of the Ipus for Koko and Piko. She cleaned, polished and decorated them with crystals. They became the boy's most treasured possession.
Koko's and Piko's Aumakua (Guardian Spirit) is the Honu (Turtle). The Hawaiian Honu represents long life, safety, peace, and good luck.  Tutu lovingly draped 2 sacred Honu amulets around the twin's necks.
All these things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha (Love) for her beloved Mo’opunas (grandchildren).


Pele is about 4” tall.

Koko and Piko are about 3" tall fitting in the palm of your hand. 


The bodies are made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Pele, Koko and Piko have tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

There is nothing Koko and Piko enjoy more than spending time with their big Tita (sister). Pele adores her Po'ikis. Laughing and playing together, she holds Koko's hand as the three of them walk companionably through the sacred Ohia Forest. They chant to the divine beat of the Ipus to honor the Akuas (spirits) of the forest.

Pele, Piko and Koko are one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Pele, Koko and Piko bless you with the Aloha Spirit.




Friday, July 17, 2015

Hina, Hawaiian Goddess of the Moon


Mahina o hoku
Hoʻike aʻe ʻoe
A i kou nani

Full moon of the night
Reveal your
Beauty

Hina, Goddess of the moon and of healing, was said to have climbed a rainbow from the ocean depths to the moon.
Hina wanted to be free from the demands of others and escape her endless everyday chores, in order to find her sacred place and express her creativity.

In the Hawaiian creation chant ,Kumulipo, she is called Hina'opuhalako'a, "Hina from whose womb came various forms". She is the Goddess of conception, menstruation, and nurturing.
While planting, Hawaiians chant to Hina to invoke her blessings.
Goddess of coral and sea creatures, Hawaiian fishermen relate to Hina by watching the rising and setting of the stars for the right timing of fishing.

Hina's creativity is illuminated through her connection with the cycles of life. She cradles a cosmic Ipu (gourd) containing the seeds of the heavens, from which the moon, stars, and creativity are sown.

If you look closely you can still see Hina's image in the full moon, beating the tapa.


Honoring Hina channels new growth.
Let go of the demands of everyday life and take a retreat of stillness. 
Connect with the earth and the moon, express intuition and creativity.
Join Hina in planting the seeds of heaven to grow dreams and communicate visions to the Mana of the Universe.
Reap what you sow and celebrate your crop!
 Hina inspires us to feel, play, dance, be.

Little Menehune girl, Hina, was created in honor of Hawaii's Moon Goddess.
Hina, Hawaiian Goddess of the Moon

Birthdate: Lulai 12, 2015 (07/12/15)


 Hina bestows blessings of new growth, intuition and creativity.

The sacred drumming of the Ipu (gourd) echoes across the 'Aina (land) as Hina chants to the Akuas (spirits) of the moon:

Mahina o hoku
Hoʻike aʻe ʻoe
A i kou nani

Full moon of the night
Reveal your
Beauty

 Because of her devotion to the moon Mana (spiritual energy), Hina was named after the Hawaiian Goddess of the Moon.
Standing in her moon chair, Hina blesses her Menehune Ohana (family) with new growth, intuition and creativity by generously sprinkling the seeds of heaven from her cosmic Ipu upon them.
The Menehunes watch in awe as the heavenly seeds attune them to spirit and gladden their heart.

Join Hina in planting the seeds of heaven to grow dreams and communicate visions to the Mana of the Universe.
Reap what you sow and celebrate your crop!


Hina’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Maile Haku (head lei). Maile is the lei of eternal love. It is believed to link to the divine.
Tutu also sewed Hina’s blue moon dress. She crocheted white panties and matching shoes. She adorned the shoes and top of the dress with star crystals and crafted 2 crystal bracelets. The crystals symbolize magic.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Tutu picked the most beautiful of the Ipus for Hina. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a star crystal. It became Hina’s most treasured possession.
All these precious things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha (Love) for her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Hina is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button
The coconut for Hina’s chair was selected from palm trees at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. It is hand carved, sanded, polished, and fit to a custom coconut base.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

 At night, Hina dwells in her moon chair. Feeling like a sparkling diamond shining among the stars, Hina gets lost in the majestic beauty of the moon.

 Hina is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Hina inspires us to feel, play, dance, be.



Monday, July 6, 2015

Haumea, the Great Hawaiian Earth Goddess

“O Haumea nui aiwaiwa.” 
Great Haumea was mysterious. 

Haumea is regarded as the mother of the Hawaiian people. She is said to be the first who walked the sacred Hawaiian Islands giving birth to many children, including Pele, the famous Hawaiian Volcano Goddess.
Haumea is the Hawaiian Earth Goddess of fertility and birth. She is a calm, gentle, loving, and nurturing Goddess. She enhances our awareness that humans originated from the earth and are inseparably connected to her. Haumea is the bringer of fruition and sustenance. She provides unlimited abundance.

“He lau kinoo ia wahine o Haumea” 
This woman Haumea had many forms. 

Haumea was believed to have the power to change her form and her appearance from a young woman to an old woman. In Hawaiian chants she is called “Haumea of mysterious forms, of eightfold form, of four hundred thousand forms”.

The 'Ulu (breadfruit tree) was sacred to Haumea. She would embody herself at will into an 'Ulu tree which provided a never ending abundance of breadfruit for the Hawaiian people.


“Komo I ka ‘ulu, he ‘ulu ia.” 
Entering a growing tree, she became a breadfruit tree. 

As the Goddess of birth and fertility, Haumea became the Hawaiian people’s divine midwife. She would appear at birth to offer comfort and natural home remedies, ensuring an easy painless labor for the mother.

One of the Hawaiian legends tells the story of Muleiula who is having a difficult birth.
As the women prepare for a caesarian, Haumea appears and says:” In our land babies are born naturally. Give the mother the Kani ka wi blossom of the Ka lau o ke kahuli tree.” After the girl ate some of the blossom her child was born easily and naturally.

Mother Earth provides insights, strength, clarity and wisdom. In our connection with her we find an unlimited source of support and nourishment. Haumea inspires us to restore our connection to Mother Earth, to honor her and be forever grateful for life's unlimited sustenance and abundance. 


Ola Ka 'Aina.
The land lives.

Menehune girl Haumea was created in the spirit of the great Hawaiian Earth Goddess.

Haumea, Hawaiian Earth Goddess
Birthdate: Lulai 4, 2015 (07/04/15)

Allow the gentle pull of Haumea's Mana to guide you to your place of power!

Like the Hawaiian Earth Goddess she is named after, Haumea is blessed with a loving, nurturing, gentle heart. With her unconditional Aloha spirit she nurtures and helps all who are in need.
Haumea is resting under her sacred ‘Ulu (breadfruit) Tree, which provides a never ending abundance of nourishments, strength and endurance.
In the morning Haumea calls her Menehune Ohana (family) to breakfast. After picking a big breadfruit from the tree she cuts it into thin slices which she fries like pancakes. It tastes so good! The Menehunes are having a feast.

Haumea’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the green feather Haku (head lei) and wrist leis. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine.
Tutu also sewed Haumea’s yellow drewss. She crocheted yellow panties and matching shoes. She adorned the shoes and top of the dress with yellow crystals. All these things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha (Love) for her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Haumea is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button
The ‘Ulu (breadfruit) Tree is handcrafted out of coconut shell, artificial leaves and clay.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Haumea loves to dwell in the cool shade of her ‘Ulu Tree rejoicing in the abundance of Mother Earth.

Haumea is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Haumea inspires us to honor Mother Earth.





Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Alohi, a Huggable Hawaiian Menehune Doll


Huggable Hawaiian Menehune Dolls bring their magic 
into your and your children's life.

Alohi (Love) is a Menehune Hula dancer. She wears a grass skirt, a pink bikini with Plumeria flowers and feather leis around her head, wrists and ankles. Her beautiful black hair and skirt are adorned with pink flowers.
Alohi carries the Aloha spirit of Hawaii. She is ready to be your new friend and dance her way into your heart. 

Huggable Menehunes are 10” tall cloth dolls who were individually handcrafted on the Big Island of Hawaii with the greatest love and respect for all that is Hawaii.



Monday, June 15, 2015

Pele, Hawaiian Volcano Goddess

Pele, Hawaiian Volcano Goddess
Birthdate: Lune 15, 2015 (06/15/15)


Aloha e Pele! (Greetings, Pele!) 

The Menehunes clap their hands, jumping up and down with excitement as soon as Pele emerges from the sacred Ohia forest.
Pele always brings the most fascinating news about the flaming spirit of Hawaii’s Volcano Goddess hurling fiery ribbons of lava down the mountain slopes, giving birth to new rock formations and land.
Pele’s gifts and blessings are the Maile Lei and a flame of Kilauea Volcano in a black lava bowl. Maile is the lei of eternal love. The flame embodies the light of spirit, knowledge and life. 


Pele offers her strength and passion to remind us that life’s fiery eruptions and emotional upheavals often clear the path for positive transformations.

Gifted with a passionate spirit, little Menehune girl Pele was named after Hawaii’s Fire Goddess.



Pele’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Fern Haku (head lei) and waist lei. Hawaiian tree ferns represent spiritual strength, unity and love.
Tutu also sewed Pele’s red flame skirt and top. She crocheted black panties and matching shoes. She adorned the shoes and top with black crystals.
All these things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha (Love) for her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).



Pele is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Pele has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


Pele often walks through the sacred Hawaiian Ohia forest. She always rejoices in the Mana of peace and happiness that surrounds her.

Pele is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.


Pele blesses you with her flame of Kilauea Volcano.