Saturday, December 27, 2014

Aloha Doll Ornaments

Aloha Nui Loa (with lots of love)
Aloha Dolls radiate the magical spirit of Hawaii to all who are around them.

Aloha Dolls are one of a kind ornament dolls who were individually handcrafted on the Big Island of Hawaii with the greatest love and respect for all that is Hawaii.
They are a miniature simplified version of the collectible Magical Hawaiian Menehune Dolls. Aloha Dolls are about 3" tall. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton and stuffed with high quality poly fill. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face giving each doll a unique personality. Aloha Dolls are made to be handled with love and care. They are not suitable as a child's toy.
They are hung from an invisible loop to add their enchanting grace to any tree and embrace your home with the Aloha spirit of Hawaii.

Aloha Dolls are a wonderful gift to people close to you or to yourself at any time of the year.

Lulu embraces you with peace and harmony.

Lulu (Peace) wears a green grass skirt, an orange bikini, a green Ti leaf lei and a Plumeria flower. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


Leilani invites you to enter her sacred space so that your beauty can unfold like the precious blossoms of the Plumeria Tree. 

Leilani (Heavenly Flower) has green leaf wings. She is a little flower fairy and wears a green, white and yellow flower dress, a yellow head lei and a Plumeria flower. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


Pele radiates strength and passion. 

Pele is named after the famous Hawaiian Volcano Goddess. She wears a lava red dress and a green feather head lei adorned wit red crystals. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


Allow Alohi to bless you with her love and let the spirit of Aloha shine from your heart. 

Alohi (Love) wears a hula skirt, a green feather lei and a green colored bikini. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Christmas Hula

Mele Kalikimaka! 
(Merry Christmas)

All these Menehunes are dancing into the Christmas spirit.Why not join them in their inspired celebration?

Uli'uli’s and Pu'ili’s Hula honors the miracle of creation.


Kahiko’s dance inspires us to awake, move forward and persevere, to live in faith with intention, determination and courage.


The gentle breeze of Olapa’s Mana (spiritual energy) empowers the spirit within.


Pua 'Olena’s dance channels the healing Mana of the 'Olena plant.



Mele Kalikimaka!






Saturday, September 6, 2014

Hawaiian Halloween, Pala'ai, the Menehune Witch


Creating a miniature Menehune witch combining colors, dress codes and accessories pertaining to Halloween and Hawaii challenged my imagination.
But here she is: Pala'ai, the little Menehune Witch.


Pala'ai (Pumpkin)
Birth Date: ‘Okakopa 31, 2013 (10-31-13)

It’s Halloween in the Menehune village! There is so much excitement in the air!
Pala'ai was born on October 31 and Halloween just is her favorite time of the year. This year, Pala'ai (Pumpkin) is dressed up as a little witch. Carrying her Ipu Pu (pumpkin), she zooms on her broom to the Menehune Ohana (family) casting blessings and magical spells of Aloha (love) upon everyone she meets. Pala'ai’s happiness is contagious and in no time all the Menehunes wear big smiles on their faces, sharing their favorite Halloween treats, mai’as (bananas) and kahikis (pineapple), with each other.

Pala'ai’s magical Mana (spiritual energy) casts blessings of love and joy.

Pala'ai’s Tutu (grandmother) made her Halloween costume. She crocheted the witch’s hat and decorated it with a green feather Haku and an orange pompon on the tip. Tutu sewed a black cape out of silky material held together by a crystal in the front and an orange wraparound skirt with a Hawaiian flower design. She wove another green feather lei which Pala'ai wears around her hips. Tutu crocheted Pala'ai’s pointy black witch’s shoes and decorated the tips with small black pompons. She also crocheted Ipu Pu (pumpkin) and embroidered a face onto him. Then she gave Pala'ai an orange Plumeria flower to put behind her ear and her magical kitchen broom because a witch just has to have a broom.
Pala'ai’s witch costume was Tutu’s gift of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter). Pala'ai loves to wear it. It makes her feel like a real little Hawaiian Menehune witch.


Pala'ai is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Pala'ai has tiny little hands and feet, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Pala'ai is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Pala'ai conveys the Aloha spirit of Hawaii.







Sunday, August 24, 2014

Rainbows of Hawaii

O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

Anuenue, the Hawaiian rainbow, is the pathway between dimensions in Hawaiian mythology. The rainbow was often associated with messages from the spirit world and death. Death was believed to be a transformation of the soul where it began to move between the earth and upper realms of the ancestors. The soul then became a god who was able to enjoy earthly abundance. The rainbow was the path the Gods used to travel from Nu'umealani, 'the sacred raised land of the heavenly ones', down to earth.

The rainbow is a symbol of transformation and pathways to the heavens of raised consciousness and enlightenment. The clouds and shadows in nature and within ourselves are illuminated by the rainbow. The rainbow shines light upon all that interferes with unity and wholeness.

O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

'Ula' means flame, 'Inoa' means name. The rainbow ignites the spiritual in your name. It refers to those who are related by the fire in their spirits, which burns for peace, harmony, justice and love of the earth. In the heat of this fire, Rainbow Warriors fight fear and doubt pursuing the rainbow path. The ancient wisdom of the rainbow can be found in all cultures and is actively used to eternalize peace and harmony in the world. Rainbow Warriors teach this ancient wisdom to those who have forgotten.
Clouds, thunder, lightning and rain precede the shining beauty of every rainbow. As you go through transformations and move on to new realms of existence, the rainbow lights the way to your pot of gold.

Anuenue,the Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess, is a messenger of the Gods. Also called, the Beauty of Manoa, she was born of the divine wind and rain of Manoa Valley on Oahu. Since ancient times the valley has been regarded as “the royal palace of rainbows,” where Anuenue, the beautiful Rainbow Maiden, can be seen playing wherever the light of sun touches the misty rain. Anuenue is so beautiful that a rainbow follows her wherever she goes.
Anuenue was raised by her grandmother Waka in a secret forest clearing in Manoa Valley. Waka surrounded her Mo'opuna Wahine (granddaughter) in a fine mist to guard her maidenhood until she would be ready to marry a man of highest royalty. There Anuenue lives up to this day.
Her 'I’iwi bird guardians bring her gifts of Ohia Lehua blossom as Anuenue watches over the Aina (sacred land). 

Rainbows are seen so frequently in Hawaii, that the Islands are often called 'the Rainbow State'.
To the ancient Hawaiians rainbows were a symbol of good luck and prosperity. Babies destined to become great chieftains were born with rainbows over their homes and accompanied by rainbows throughout their lives. 

Rainbow Warrior

Rainbows were such an important part of Hawaiians culture that they were often portrayed in petroglyphs. A woman with an arch or rainbow signifies she is wise, honored and respected. A man and a rainbow in a petroglyph is interpreted as the keeper of the land and its people. Such petroglyphs are found in the Big Island’s lava fields and in the sacred Iao Valley of Maui.

Some natives have said that each color of the rainbow represents a Goddess and thinking of that color will bring about the element associated with it:

-White represents the element of water and the Goddess Hina who bestows knowledge and awareness.

-Earth Goddess Haumea promises freedom and release. She bears the color red. A stone is used as her element.

-Orange is for the Volcano Goddess Pele who infuses energy and focus. She commands the fire element.

-Yellow is for the Goddess Hi’iaka who gives presence and purpose. Her element is the wind.

-Purple is for Goddess Uli, who endows success and effectiveness. People are her element.

-Green is for the element of plants and Goddess Laka, who showers love and compassion.

-Blue is for the Goddess Kapo, the giver of power and ability. An animal is her element.

The rainbow represents the bridge that connects us to the source.


Magical Menehune girl Anuenue was created in honor of the beautiful Hawaiian rainbow and its inspiring spiritual significance.


Anuenue, Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess
Birth Date: 'Aukake 24, 2014 (08-24-14)


O ka 'onohi ula o ka lani ko inoa
The rainbow of heaven is your name

The gentle drum of the Ipu (gourd) echoes through the Ohia Forest as a beautiful rainbow slowly approaches the Menehune village. Full of excitement, the Menehunes run to the gathering place. Anuenue is coming! She is their bringer of good luck and prosperity.
Anuenue is named after the Hawaiian Rainbow Goddess. Anuenue is so lovely that a rainbow follows her wherever she goes. One of the most beautiful rainbows just couldn't let go and imbued itself onto her dress.


Believe in your dreams and follow Anuenue on the rainbow path. Like the rainbow, her Mana (spiritual energy) illuminates the way to your pot of gold.




Anuenue's head is surrounded by a halo of fragrant Maile and sacred yellow Lehua Blossoms. Crystal bracelets adorn her wrists and the flower on her dress. 
Maile is the lei of eternal love. Lehua means "Flower sacred to the Gods" in the Hawaiian language. Crystals inspire spiritual strength, unity and love.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Anuenue’s Tutu (grandmother) picked the most beautiful of the Ipus. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a purple crystal and cord.
It was her sacred gift of 
Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter) and became Anuenue’s most treasured possession.


Anuenue is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All of Anuenue’s accessories were individually handcrafted.
Guarded by the Tiki God of Love, Anuenue chants softly to the sound of her Ipu worshipping the enchanting Ohia Forest.

Anuenue is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by 
Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with the Tiki God of Love, her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Anuenue is the bearer of good luck and prosperity.














Saturday, August 2, 2014

Sacred Hula, the Soul of Hawaii


Aloha Mai 
 I come with love.

Hula is a highly ritualized Hawaiian dance expressing praise and worship to the Aloha spirit of Hawaii. The ancient Hawaiian Hula is a way of life linking humanity to spirit. It teaches about nature, respect and all that is sacred. 

Hula is referred to as the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people.

Many Kumu Hulas (Hula teachers) and Haumanas (students) dedicate their life to the art of Hula. Purification, rituals, and ceremonies have always been a prelude to this sacred dance which expresses love and humbleness. The beautiful movements tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and much more.
Chants give life to Hula. Chants possess great Mana (spiritual energy) through the power of words.

Ke Ao Nani 
(The Beautiful World) 

I luna la i luna
Na manu o ka lewa

I lalo la i lalo
Na pua o ka honua

I uka la i uka
Na ulu la`au

I kai la i kai
Na i`a o ka moana

Ha`ina mai ka puana
A he nani ke ao nei

He inoa no kamali`i
______

Up above, above
Birds of the heavens

Below, below
Flowers of the earth

In the mountains, mountains
The forests

In the sea, the sea
Fishes of the ocean

Tell the refrain
Of the beautiful world

In the name of children

(Nona Beamer Collection)


Dancers often accompany themselves using a variety of traditional Hawaiian instruments which add the thrill of percussive sound to the Hula.
Vibrant colored feather gourds, called Ulu'uli, enhance the excitement of the dance.

Uli'uli


The Pu`ili dancing sticks are split bamboo rattles which intensify the rhythm of the hula.

Pu'ili

Together, the chant, the dance, and the instruments contain a magic that fills both, dancers and audience, with the spirit of Aloha.

The spiritual power of this beautiful dance inspired the creation of the Menehune twins 
Uli'uli and Pu'ili.
Hula dancers follow strict traditions when gathering the plants and materials for their costumes and instruments. Uliuli’s and Pili’s miniature costumes and accessories follow these traditions as closely as possible. A lot of love and energy went into their creation.

Eventually Uli'uli and Pu'ili became alive with the magic of Hula.


Uli'uli and Pu'ili
(Feather Gourd & Dancing Stick) 
Birth Date: ʻAukake 1, 2014 (08/01/14)

Aloha Mai 
I come with love.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili dance the ancient Hawaiian Kahiko Hula in unity and harmony.
The beautiful movements of their hands and bodies tell stories about the wonders of nature, the creation of the world and the Menehune Ohana (family). Uli'uli’s traditional feather gourds add sound and excitement to their dance. Pu`ili dancing sticks enhance the rhythm of their dance.

Uli'uli’s and Pu'ili’s Hula honors the miracle of creation.
Join them in their celebration of life’s joys and abundance.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili are Menehune Twins. Tutu (grandmother) is their Kumu Hula (Hula Teacher). She taught them the powerful movements of the Kahiko Hula.
Uli'uli is named after the Hawaiian Uli'uli (feather gourd). Tutu and Uli'uli made the feather gourds out of wood and bright red and yellow feathers. Tutu and Pu'ili carved his dancing sticks out of bamboo. Tutu blessed everything with Hawaiian salt and special prayers. The gourds and dancing sticks are sacred now. They were created for Uli'uli and Pu'ili and only they are allowed to touch them.
Tutu also hand crafted the traditional Ti leaf skirt and Malu (loincloth) for her Mo’opunas (grandchildren). In Hawaii Ti Leafs are used for protection and purification.
Tutu sewed a red top for Uli'uili and crocheted matching red panties.
She wove a yellow feather cape for Pu'ili and green feather Hakus (head leis), wrist and ankle leis for both of the twins. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine.
All these precious things were Tutu’s gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opunas.


Uli'uli and Pu'ili are about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. 


The bodies are made out of stretch cotton. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Uli'uli and Pu'ili have tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and belly buttons.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Uli'uli and Pu'ili are one of a kind display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.


Uli'uli's and Pu'ili's Hula teaches about all that is sacred.




Thursday, June 12, 2014

Magical Powers of Hawaiian Ti Leaves



From ancient Hawaii up to this day the leaves of the Hawaiian Ti plant have been used for spiritual protection, purification and healing. Ti Leaves are sacred to Lono, the Hawaiian god of fertility and Laka, the goddess of Hula.
In ancient Hawaii Ti Leaves symbolized high rank and divine powers. Only the Ali’i (royalty) and Kahunas (high priests) were allowed to wear Ti leaves during their ceremonial rituals to ward off evil spirits and invoke the blessings of the gods.


In Hawaii Ti Leaves were and are still also used for many practical purposes, like wrapping food, making hula skirts and weaving leis.
Many people in Hawaii, me included, plant a Ti Leaf plant on each corner of their house for protection, purification, blessings, and good luck.
Ti Leaves have a very special, intense Mana (spiritual energy). I frequently pick 4 of the beautiful, shiny green leaves. The number four was considered sacred by ancient Hawaiians. Sometimes I surround myself with 4 Ti Leaves during meditation, which creates a feeling of resting within a sacred circle of light. At other times, I put them under certain objects or pictures to invoke protection, purification, blessing or healing.
Carrying a piece of a Ti Leaf on your body is believed to provide protection from negative energies. Wearing a Ti Leaf lei brings good luck. 

Bless your house with the powerful Mana of Ti Leaves! 

They make beautiful decorations and radiate a special feeling of safety and protection throughout the house.
The sacred Hawaiian Ti Leaves inspired the creation of Ti, a Magical Hawaiian Menehune.



Ti 

Birth Date: Lune 12, 2014 (06/12/14) 

Ti wanders happily through the enchanting Ohia forest. His Mana (spiritual energy) connects with the peace and serenity of Hawaii. In silence he communicates with nature honoring the divinity in all living things.
Ti is named after he Hawaiian Ti Plant which invokes spiritual protection, healing and good luck.


Empowered by the Ti Plant and his Ti Leaf torch, Ti's Mana bestows prosperity and blessings of body, mind and spirit. 

Ti’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana into his Ti Leaf Haku (head lei). She sewed his Lavalava (wraparound) and crocheted green underpants. Last she strung and draped a Kukui Nut necklace around his neck. The Kukui Nut represents spirit revealing itself. The necklace blesses and protects Ti. Ti’s Kuku (grandfather) crafted the Ihoiho (torch) out of bamboo and Ti Leaves and fueled it with Kukui Nut oil.
All these things were Tutu’s and Kuku's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo'opuna Kane (grandson).


 

Ti is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. His body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto his face. Ti has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. The Ti Plant is made out of Ohia wood and artificial leaves.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Ti is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
He comes with the Ti Plant, his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Ti brings blessings, healing and prosperity to all who are around him. 


Sunday, May 18, 2014

Lono, the Good Luck Girl

Lono (Abundance), the Good Luck Girl

Lono was created for a Custom Order. She is a Lucky Doll who  conveys good luck, fortune and well being to all who are around her.
Here is Lono's story:

Celebrating the abundance of life, Lono plays happily in the beautiful Hawaiian Ohia Forest. She is collecting nature's treasures to honor the Akuas (Gods)and share with her Menehune Ohana (family).

Lono chants softly:

"Mahalo e Na Akua"
(Gratitude and thanks to the Gods)

Lono is a lucky Kamahine (girl). Her Mana (spiritual energy) radiates abundance, good luck and well being.

Today she found 2 lucky four leaf 'Ihi'ihis (clover) which she put in her hair and on her dress.
Lono's gift to you is the beautiful Pu (conch shell) she carries. In Hawaii the Pu is said to attract prosperity, an abundance of wealth, good fortune, and well-being.


Lono's Tutu (grandmother) sewed her dress out of soft green cloth. Green is the color of balance, harmony and abundance. Tutu also crocheted purple panties and matching little shoes. She adorned the shoes, the dress and Lono's beautiful black hair with purple crystals. Tutu also crafted 2 purple crystal bracelets. Purple crystals symbolize magic.
All these things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha to her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Lono is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All of Lono’s accessories were individually handcrafted.
Lono is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.


Lono's Mana conveys good luck, fortune and well being to all who are around her.


Custom Orders are welcome at:








Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Hau'oli La Makuahine! Happy Mother's Day!


On Mother's Day we celebrate and honor the loving, caring essence of all mothers. It is the time to cherish the special bond of love we share with our mothers. The ritual of giving gifts expresses this gratitude to all mother figures in our lifes, like aunties, sister, grandmothers, not to forget the greatest mothers of all, Mother Earth and Mother Nature .

Mahalo nui loa 
He Makana Nau Aloha Nui Loa

(Thank you very much. 
A gift for you with all my love.)

Honu Pepe, the Turtle Baby, was created in the honor of all mothers.



Honu Pepe, theTurtle Baby 

Birth Date: Mei 1, 2014 (05/01/14)

He nani lua 'ole
Ku'u wehi o nâ lani
He kilohana 'oe
Na'u e pûlama mau
Hô'olu i ka poli e
Mehana i ke anu e.

I can smile when it's raining
Touch the warmth of the sun
I hear children laughing
In this place that I love
Where I live there are rainbows
With life in the laughter of morning
And birds filled with song

The Menehunes are softly chanting a Hawaiian lullaby to Honu Pepe. He is their Keiki Punahele (beloved child). The Menehunes rejoice in Honu Pepe’s sweet innocence. They love him and take turns watching over him at all times. When Honu Pepe is hungry, they nurture him with his favorite treats, warm baby milk and Mai’as (bananas).
Nestled in the ferns and surrounded by his Ohana’s (family’s) Aloha (love), Honu Pepe lies contently in his coconut cradle sucking on his thumb. The deep inner knowing that he is always taken care of fills him with trust and love. 


Honu Pepe is named after his Aumakua (Guardian Spirit), the Hawaiian Sea Turtle. The little green Turtle in his coconut cradle has become his constant companion and closest friend. Together they rejoice in the Mana of peace and happiness that surrounds them.
Honu Pepe is deeply connected with the ancient wisdom of the Turtle. The Hawaiian Honu represents long life, safety, peace, and good luck.

A
llow the Honu’s wisdom to embrace you and guide you on your quest.

Honu Pepe’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha into the Kupukupu (fern) lei he wears around his neck before she gave it to her beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson). Hawaiian tree ferns represent spiritual strength, unity and love.
Tutu crocheted his blue pants and matching booties which she adorned with 2 yellow Lehua flowers and tiny red crystals. She also sewed the blue bedding and curtains with a Turtle design for the cradle, sewed 2 turtle buttons on the sides and decorated the top with a yellow feather lei. The Hulu (feather) lei is believed to link to the divine.


Honu Pepe is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Honu Pepe has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
The little turtle is about 1.5” long. Her body is made out of soft green cloth and wired for flexibility.
The coconut for Honu Pepe’s cradle was selected from palm trees at 
Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. It is hand carved, sanded, polished, and fit to a custom coconut base.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.
Honu Pepe and his Honu are a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
Honu Pepe comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Honu Pepe reflects the Aloha spirit of Hawaii.





Monday, April 7, 2014

Kohola, the Humpback Whale, Majestic Aumakua of Hawaiian Waters



The majestic Koholas grace us with their presence in the vast Pacific Ocean around the Islands of Hawaii. Their enormous sphere of magical Mana (spiritual energy) is absolutely mesmerizing.
The entrancing sound of the Kohala’s song is synchronized with the oneness that exists in all. It is one of the most complex signals made by any animal in the world.
In the Hawaiian waters all Humpback Whales in a certain area sing the same song during mating and birthing season from November until May. Within the 6 months season they all conform to the slowly changing themes of their song. The about 20 minute long song is often sung over and over for hours.

Koholas play a significant role in Hawaiian culture. Native Hawaiians have always honored the gentle guidance and wisdom of the Koholas. Whales are the essence of their deep rooted connection with the ocean and the Humpback Whale has become Aumakua to many Hawaiians. He is their ancestral guardian spirit, who guides, protects and inspires them.
Early Hawaiians worshipped the Kohola in the Kumulipo Chant, the Hawaiian Chant of Creation:

"Hanau ka palaoa noho I kai"
Born is the whale living in the ocean.

In Hawaiian mythology, Kanaloa was the god of the ocean. Kohola is a majestic manifestation of Kanaloa.

Lei Niho Palaoa

The Lei Niho Palaoa is a whale tooth pendant and was an important symbol of rank for the highest Ali‘i (royalty) of Hawaii. The whale teeth were collected from carcasses that had washed ashore. The carved hook pendant was strung on thousands of finely braided strands of human hair. The scarcity and beauty of the Lei Niho Palaoa and its connection to Kanaloa brought Mana (spiritual power) to the carver and the pendant’s wearer. The Ali’i believed that, by wearing this Kinolau (body form) of the great god, they would embody Kanaloa’s powerful Mana.

The humpback whale is an endangered species. Commercial whaling at the start of the 20th century has depleted the global whale population. Today, more than 10,000 Humpback Whales use the warm Hawaiian waters as their wintering ground to mate, give birth and care for their young.

Kohola, the Menehune Sailor, was created in honor of the grandeur, wisdom and grace of the majestic Humpback Whale.
Here is Kohola's story:


 Kohola (Humpback Whale)
Birthdate: 'Apelila 4, 2014 (04/04/14)

Kohola is named after his Aumakua (ancestral guardian spirit), the majestic Humpback Whale. Kohola always feels protected by the guidance and wisdom of his Aumakua, when he sails his coconut boat in the gentle breeze of Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. He follows the entrancing sound of the Whale’s song which leads him to his treasures and away from all harm.

Kohola’s treasures are the precious conch shells he scoops up with his fishing net when he sails his 
coconut boat through the beautiful bays of Punaluu Black Sands Beach. 

The Pu (Conch Shell) is a gift from the Pacific Ocean. When blown, its pure sound echoes across the ‘Aina (land) invoking blessings of divine Mana (spiritual energy).

Kohola is the most generous little Menehune. His heart is as big as the whale. Kohola's Mana (spiritual energy) is Aloha (love) and compassion. Sharing his treasures with his Menehune Ohana (family) brings him the greatest joy. Nothing makes Kohola happier than passing out the most treasurable shell gifts to his Menehune Ohana and seeing their joy and appreciation which in turn is the greatest gift to him.


Kohola knows that the more he gives, the more he will receive. Kohola sees with his heart and acts with compassion.



Kohola’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana into the Ti Leaf Leis he wears around his head and neck and draped another one around the sail of his canoe. According to ancient Hawaiian beliefs, Ti leaves provide protection from all harm. Surrounded by Ti leaves and guided by his Aumakua, the Humpback Whale, Kohola always feels save and secure.
Tutu also sewed his ocean blue Malu (wraparound) and crocheted his red pants. All this were Tutu’s sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).




Kohola is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kohola has little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. His malu (wraparound) is sewn out of the same cotton fabric as his sail. The hand carved, sanded and polished coconut for Kohala’s boat was selected from palm trees at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

The Humpback Whale on his sail gives Kohola the greatest comfort. It reminds him that, if he should ever get lost at sea, he can call on his Aumakua, the Whale, who always, without fail, will come to guide him safely back to shore.

Kohola is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. His coconut boat is signed and dated. Kohola comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Kohola reflects the majestic Mana of the Humpback Whale.


www.HawaiianCollectibleMenehuneDolls.com






Monday, March 24, 2014

The Hawaiian Olapa Dance, Empowering the Spirit Within



Birthdate: Malaki 24,2014 (03/24/14)


As the leaves of the Hawaiian Niu (Coconut Palm) sway gently in the slightest breeze so does Olapa (Dancer) move with the energies of the Universe.
Singing and dancing to the sweet sound of her Ukulele, she explores everything nature has to offer.

Mana I ka pua
Ua mohala malie.

There is Mana in the flower
That has blossomed slowly.

The Menehunes clap their hands in delight, begging for some more of Olapa’s delightful dances and music. The enchanting sound of the Ukulele accompanies her songs and dances about the Menehune Ohana (family), Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe. Celebrating Hawaii’s Aloha spirit, the Menehunes dance with Olapa under the Palm trees to the rhythm of her wonderful music.

Olapa's dance and music illuminate life with joy and happiness. Her cheerful Mana (Spiritual Energy) brightens up the day with love and laughter.



Olapa’sTutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Ti Leaf leis she wears around her head and wrists. Ti leaves are sacred to Laka, the Goddess of Hula. According to ancient Hawaiian beliefs, Ti leaves provide spiritual protection and invoke the blessings of the Gods.


Tutu also wove Olapa’s green Ti leaf skirt and sewed a blue cotton top and matching pants for her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).
The Ukulele was Kuku’s (grandfather’s) gift of lasting love and Aloha to Olapa. It became her most cherished possession. She holds it even when she goes to sleep.



Olapa is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
The stem of the Palm tree is made out of the seed pod of a Hawaiian Palm. The hand carved, sanded and polished coconut base was selected from palm trees at Punalu'u Black Sands Beach.
All of Olapa’s accessories were individually handcrafted.



In the evenings Olapa and her brother, Kahiko (Hula), often dance and sing together under the Palm trees at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Olapa is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
She comes with the Palm tree, her story and a certificate of authenticity.

The gentle breeze of Olapa’s Mana (spiritual energy) empowers the spirit within.

www.HawaiianCollectibleMenehuneDolls.com



Monday, March 10, 2014

The Hawaiian Oli Chant, Returning to Our Spiritual Source


“E Alae!”
(Arise!)


In the awareness of Mana (spirit) and Kuleana (responsibility) to all things, Hawaiian Kahunas (priests) greeted the sunrise with this simple Oli chant.

In ancient Hawaii words held great power. The Oli is recognized as the highest form of the Hawaiian language. It is the soul of Hawaii, preserving history, traditions and prayers.

The spiritual power of an Oli lies in its Kaona (hidden meaning). For example depending on the perception of the chanter and listener, the mention of the Lehua blossom could be a metaphor for love or it could tell about an actual event in a family’s history.

The beautiful sound, tonal patterns and vibrations invoke a connection to the deepest spiritual essence of the chant.

The Oli attunes us to spirit, expands our consciousness and gladdens the heart.

The concept of ancient Hawaiian teachings conveys that our highest purpose for being on this planet is to connect to the spiritual source. The following Oli calls in the higher self, invoking inspiration, protection and wisdom:

“Moe Uhane (calling the spririt)

He kanaka loa

He kanaka poko

He ui a’a he alaneo

A na maka pa I ka lani

Malu ka honua

La kama uhili e

He’e nei ku

I ka moe au a ke kahuna”


The power of these ancient words can alter the energy around us transcending our being into the supreme light of truth.

The Hawaiian Oli chant inspired the creation of Magical Menehune Girl, Oli.


Oli (Chant)

Birthdate: Malaki 8, 2014 (03/08/14)


“E Alae!”

(Arise!)


Oli chants and drums on her Ipu (gourd) calling the Menehune Ohana (family). Eagerly the Menehunes come running to the family gathering place in the beautiful Ohia forest. They know, Oli is ready to chant yet another one of her exciting stories for them. Her chants tell about the Menehune Ohana, the Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe. The Menehunes listen to Oli’s chants in wonder, sometimes laughing, sometimes crying, and always full of excitement. Oli’s chants are wonderful!
Oli uses her words to weave the chants into being. She knows that words and thoughts have tremendous power to shape reality, often changing the past, present, and future.

Oli’s chants invoke inspiration, protection and wisdom.

Oli’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Haku (head lei) and wrist leis. She made the Haku out of the traditional fragrant Hawaiian Maile leaves. Maile is the lei of eternal love.
Tutu adorned the Haku with Poni ‘Awapuhi (purple ginger) and added the small fragrant yellow Puakenikeni flowers. The purple Hulu (feather) lei around her hips is believed to link to the divine.
Tutu also sewed Oli’s purple wraparound skirt and fastened a purple crystal to the matching top. She crocheted purple lacy panties.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Oli’s Tutu (grandmother) picked the most beautiful of the Ipus. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a purple crystal and cord.
It was her sacred gift of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter) and became Oli’s most treasured possession.




Oli is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All of Oli’s accessories were individually handcrafted.

Oli is named after the sacred Hawaiian Oli chant. She often walks through the serene Ohia forest in the Kaiholena Mountains, where the splendor of nature’s beauty inspires her chants. 


Kahiko, the Menehune Dancer, moves in harmony to his Kumu Hula (teacher) Oli’s sacred chants. Humbly and respectfully, Oli and Kahiko Aloha Honua (honor the earth) together.

Oli is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Oli attunes us to the spirit of Hawaii.

www.HawaiianCollectibleMenehuneDolls.com