Monday, March 24, 2014

The Hawaiian Olapa Dance, Empowering the Spirit Within



Birthdate: Malaki 24,2014 (03/24/14)


As the leaves of the Hawaiian Niu (Coconut Palm) sway gently in the slightest breeze so does Olapa (Dancer) move with the energies of the Universe.
Singing and dancing to the sweet sound of her Ukulele, she explores everything nature has to offer.

Mana I ka pua
Ua mohala malie.

There is Mana in the flower
That has blossomed slowly.

The Menehunes clap their hands in delight, begging for some more of Olapa’s delightful dances and music. The enchanting sound of the Ukulele accompanies her songs and dances about the Menehune Ohana (family), Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe. Celebrating Hawaii’s Aloha spirit, the Menehunes dance with Olapa under the Palm trees to the rhythm of her wonderful music.

Olapa's dance and music illuminate life with joy and happiness. Her cheerful Mana (Spiritual Energy) brightens up the day with love and laughter.



Olapa’sTutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Ti Leaf leis she wears around her head and wrists. Ti leaves are sacred to Laka, the Goddess of Hula. According to ancient Hawaiian beliefs, Ti leaves provide spiritual protection and invoke the blessings of the Gods.


Tutu also wove Olapa’s green Ti leaf skirt and sewed a blue cotton top and matching pants for her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).
The Ukulele was Kuku’s (grandfather’s) gift of lasting love and Aloha to Olapa. It became her most cherished possession. She holds it even when she goes to sleep.



Olapa is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
The stem of the Palm tree is made out of the seed pod of a Hawaiian Palm. The hand carved, sanded and polished coconut base was selected from palm trees at Punalu'u Black Sands Beach.
All of Olapa’s accessories were individually handcrafted.



In the evenings Olapa and her brother, Kahiko (Hula), often dance and sing together under the Palm trees at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Olapa is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
She comes with the Palm tree, her story and a certificate of authenticity.

The gentle breeze of Olapa’s Mana (spiritual energy) empowers the spirit within.

www.HawaiianCollectibleMenehuneDolls.com



Monday, March 10, 2014

The Hawaiian Oli Chant, Returning to Our Spiritual Source


“E Alae!”
(Arise!)


In the awareness of Mana (spirit) and Kuleana (responsibility) to all things, Hawaiian Kahunas (priests) greeted the sunrise with this simple Oli chant.

In ancient Hawaii words held great power. The Oli is recognized as the highest form of the Hawaiian language. It is the soul of Hawaii, preserving history, traditions and prayers.

The spiritual power of an Oli lies in its Kaona (hidden meaning). For example depending on the perception of the chanter and listener, the mention of the Lehua blossom could be a metaphor for love or it could tell about an actual event in a family’s history.

The beautiful sound, tonal patterns and vibrations invoke a connection to the deepest spiritual essence of the chant.

The Oli attunes us to spirit, expands our consciousness and gladdens the heart.

The concept of ancient Hawaiian teachings conveys that our highest purpose for being on this planet is to connect to the spiritual source. The following Oli calls in the higher self, invoking inspiration, protection and wisdom:

“Moe Uhane (calling the spririt)

He kanaka loa

He kanaka poko

He ui a’a he alaneo

A na maka pa I ka lani

Malu ka honua

La kama uhili e

He’e nei ku

I ka moe au a ke kahuna”


The power of these ancient words can alter the energy around us transcending our being into the supreme light of truth.

The Hawaiian Oli chant inspired the creation of Magical Menehune Girl, Oli.


Oli (Chant)

Birthdate: Malaki 8, 2014 (03/08/14)


“E Alae!”

(Arise!)


Oli chants and drums on her Ipu (gourd) calling the Menehune Ohana (family). Eagerly the Menehunes come running to the family gathering place in the beautiful Ohia forest. They know, Oli is ready to chant yet another one of her exciting stories for them. Her chants tell about the Menehune Ohana, the Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe. The Menehunes listen to Oli’s chants in wonder, sometimes laughing, sometimes crying, and always full of excitement. Oli’s chants are wonderful!
Oli uses her words to weave the chants into being. She knows that words and thoughts have tremendous power to shape reality, often changing the past, present, and future.

Oli’s chants invoke inspiration, protection and wisdom.

Oli’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Haku (head lei) and wrist leis. She made the Haku out of the traditional fragrant Hawaiian Maile leaves. Maile is the lei of eternal love.
Tutu adorned the Haku with Poni ‘Awapuhi (purple ginger) and added the small fragrant yellow Puakenikeni flowers. The purple Hulu (feather) lei around her hips is believed to link to the divine.
Tutu also sewed Oli’s purple wraparound skirt and fastened a purple crystal to the matching top. She crocheted purple lacy panties.
Hawaiian gourds grow on a vine. Oli’s Tutu (grandmother) picked the most beautiful of the Ipus. She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a purple crystal and cord.
It was her sacred gift of Aloha (Love) to her Mo’opuna (granddaughter) and became Oli’s most treasured possession.




Oli is about 3.5” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. She has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
All of Oli’s accessories were individually handcrafted.

Oli is named after the sacred Hawaiian Oli chant. She often walks through the serene Ohia forest in the Kaiholena Mountains, where the splendor of nature’s beauty inspires her chants. 


Kahiko, the Menehune Dancer, moves in harmony to his Kumu Hula (teacher) Oli’s sacred chants. Humbly and respectfully, Oli and Kahiko Aloha Honua (honor the earth) together.

Oli is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Oli attunes us to the spirit of Hawaii.

www.HawaiianCollectibleMenehuneDolls.com





Sunday, March 9, 2014

Hula Kahiko, an Ancient Way of Life


Ma’ema’e ke ‘ala e holo ala 
E ala mai, E naue mai, E noke mai e 

Clear the path to move on 
Awake, Move, Persevere 
(Kumu Keala Ching) 

Moving in harmony to Kumu (teacher) Hula’s sacred chants and the rhythm of her Ipu, the dancer gracefully performs the ancient Kahiko Hula.

Kahiko, the most ancient form of hula, is more than just a dance. It is an ancient artful way of life that expresses Hawaii’s rich history and spirituality.

In ancient times Hula Kahiko was danced exclusively by men. Adorned with Maile leis, the dancers honor Hawaii’s Hula Goddess Laka. Expressing a deep reverence for their spiritual roots, they performed the vigorous dance with strength and agility, intention and determination.

In the Aloha (compassion) spirit, the Lōkahi (unity) spirit, and the Pono (righteousness) spirit, the Kahiko Hula honors the gods, passes along ancient Hawaiian history and tells stories about aumakuas (ancestral guardians), the sacredness of life and respect for all things.

The enchanting ancient Hawaiian Hula inspired the creation of Magical Hawaiian Menehune Kahiko.


Kahiko (Hula) 

Birth Date: Malaki 8, 2014 (03/08/14) 


Ma’ema’e ke ‘ala e holo ala 
E ala mai, E naue mai, E noke mai e 

Clear the path to move on 
Awake, Move, Persevere 

The divine beat of the Ipu (gourd) echoes across the ‘Aina (land) as Kahiko gracefully performs the ancient Hula. With strength and agility he moves in harmony to Kumu Hula (teacher) Oli’s sacred chants.
In the Aloha (compassion) spirit, the Lōkahi (unity) spirit, and the Pono (righteousness) spirit, Kahiko honors the gods, tells stories about Aumakuas (ancestral guardians), the sacredness of life and respect for all things with his dance. The Menehune Ohana (family) loves to watch. Kahiko’s Hula and Kumu Hula Oli’s chants are wonderful!

Kahiko’s dance inspires us to awake, move forward and persevere, to live in faith with intention, determination and courage. 

Kahiko’sTutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into his Maile and Hulu (feather) leis. In Hawaii Maile is the lei of eternal love. It is worn in honor of the Hula Goddess Laka. The yellow Hulu (feather) leis around his hips and wrists are believed to link to the divine.
Tutu also wove Kahiko’s traditional grass skirt and crocheted his red pants. The red, green and yellow colors Kahiko wears honor the Mana (spiritual energy) of the land.





Kahiko is about 3.5” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kahiko has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.



Kahiko moves in harmony to the sacred chants of his Kumu Hula (teacher) Oli. Humbly and respectfully, Oli and Kahiko Aloha Honua (honor the earth) together.
Kahiko is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Kahiko’s dance honors the sacredness of life. 
Nana I Ke Kumu