Wednesday, December 23, 2015

The Hawaiian Pahu: Celebrating the Sacred

Pahu Li'i (Little Drum)

E hō mai ka ʻike mai luna mai ē
ʻO nā mea hūnā noʻeau
o nā mele ē
E hō mai ē 

Grant us the knowledge from above
The knowledge hidden 
in the chants
Grant us these things

 The strong Mana (spiritual energy) of the Hawaiian Pahu (drum) celebrates the sacred. The Pahu's sounds of power amplify sacred chants and Hula.

"Its deep solemn tone inspires the dancers and stirs the emotions of the spectators." 

The Pahu raises the Mana of celebrations and ceremonies in honor of the Akuas (Gods). All over the world the drum enhances rituals of healing, consciousness transformation and prayers. In old Hawaii drums were given names because they have a voice.

Up to this day the Pahu (drum) has been one of the most important percussion instrument in Hawaii.
According to Legend, La'a mai Kahiki (La'a from Tahiti) is said to have brought the drum and Hula dance to Hawaii during the twelfth or thirteenth century. He chanted and played the Pahu as his canoe passed the islands. On O'ahu, one of the islanders raced along the shore following the canoe while pounding his chest in imitation of La'a's drum. Later this man fashioned a drum and taught the people of O'ahu to play it.
There are different kinds of Pahus the Ho'opa'a (drummer and chanter) might use:

Pahu Hula (dance drum)


Ipu Hula (double calabash drum) 


Puniu (coconut knee drum) 





Pahu Pule (prayer drum)

Pahu Pule (prayer drum) was considered sacred and always kept in the Hale Pahu (drum house) of the Heiau (temple). Temple drums were large, up to 46 inches tall, made from coconut or breadfruit log, the drum head covered with shark or fish-skin.


The sacred nature of the Hawaiian Pahu inspired the creation of Pahu Li'i (Little Drum).


Pahu Li'i (Little Drum)
Birth Date: Kekemapa 22, 2015 (12-22-15) 

Pahu Li'i invites you to join her in a celebration of the sacred!

E hō mai ka ʻike mai luna mai ē
ʻO nā mea hūnā noʻeau
o nā mele ē
E hō mai ē

Grant us the knowledge from above
The knowledge hidden 
in the chants
Grant us these things


The divine beat of Pahu Li'i’s Drum signals the beginning of an empowering ritual.
Chanting and drumming softly, Pahu Li'i walks through the sacred Hawaiian forest. She rejoices in the Mana of peace and happiness that surrounds her.
In the Aloha (compassion) spirit, the Lōkahi (unity) spirit, and the Pono (righteousness) spirit, Pahu Li'i honors the Akuas (Gods). She tells stories about Aumakuas (ancestral guardians), the sacredness of life and respect for all things with her drumming and chants.
Pahu Li'i's rituals have the greatest potential to create healing transitions, restore peace and harmony within ourselves or in relationships, provide materialistic gains, and fulfill many more of our deepest desires.

Pahu Li'i's rituals inspire us to celebrate and manifest the sacred. 

Pahu Li'i’s Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into Pahu Li'i 's red and green feather and flower Haku (head lei), wrist and ankle leis. In Hawaii the Hulu (feather) represents spiritual strength, unity and love. It is believed to link to the divine.
Tutu also sewed Pahu Li'i’s yellow dress with a red belt and matching crocheted panties. Last she gave Pahu Li'i the precious little Puniu (coconut drum) and drum stick, which, following tradition, has been handed down through generations. All these things were Tutu's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to her beloved Mo’opuna Wahine (granddaughter).

Pahu Li'i is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Pahu Li'i has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Pahu Li'i is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.

Pahu Li'i inspires the power of rituals.






Saturday, December 12, 2015

Poli'ahu, Hawaiian Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea


In Hawaiian mythology Poli’ahu is the Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea, the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. In the Hawaiian language Poli’ahu means “caress”.
The Snow Goddess Poli’ahu gently caresses the summit of Mauna Kea with her pure white cloak in the winter and beautifies the mountain with her pink and gold cloak in the summer.

 Mauna Kea

Translated from the Hawaiian language Mauna Kea means “the White Mountain”. The mountains of the island were always sacred to the Hawaiians, and Mauna Kea is the most sacred of all. In ancient times the law allowed only high-ranking tribal chiefs to visit its peak.
The fascinating summit of the dormant volcano is at 13,803 feet the highest point in the State of Hawaii. Measured from its base on the ocean floor, it rises over 33,000 feet, making it the tallest mountain on earth. Mauna Kea last erupted about 4000 years ago.
This majestic mountain is only about one million years old. In the past glaciers covered the summit of Mauna Kea. Glacial features and a few rock glaciers have remained on the summit until today.
Mauna Kea’s high altitude, dry environment, and stable airflow make it one of the best sites in the world for astronomical observation. The world’s largest collection of international astronomical observatories is located on the summit of Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea also is home to many endangered plants and animals, including the Wekiu bug, the Palila (a rare bird), and the Mauna Kea Silversword.

Lake Waiau
Lake Waiau, located on the summit platform of Mauna Kea, is one of the highest elevated lakes on the planet. Lake Waiau is a sacred site. Ancient Hawaiians believed that the Lake was a bottomless portal to the spirit world. Its water was considered pure water of the gods. According to Hawaiian beliefs, water captured in the piko (the center) is considered pure and sacred. The water of Lake Waiau is worshipped as the most sacred. In ancient time, a chief would throw the umbilical cord of their first son into the lake to reserve the place for the child's afterlife as a chief.
People believe in the immense powers of Lake Waiau up to this day and visit it to perform rituals or collect the water for good health.


In Hawaiian mythology Pele, the Hawaiian Fire Goddess and Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess were said to have been fierce rivals. One well known Hawaiian legend tells the story of Poli’ahu winning a race against the Volcano goddess Pele at the Hawaiian sledding sport called “he’eholua”. Pele was so angry at being defeated that she threw streams of glowing lava at Poli’ahu who calmly brought down storms of snow and froze the molten rock into place. Pele surrendered and never again stepped onto Poli’ahu’s territory on Mauna Kea. The power of fire was pacified by Poli’ahu’s calmness.

The legend of the Hawaiian Snow Goddess inspired the creation of the miniature Magical Hawaiian Goddess Poli'ahu.

Poli’ahu, Hawaiian Snow Goddess of Mauna Kea
Birthdate: Kēkēmapa 12, 2015 (12/12/15)

Connect with Poli’ahu’s Mana and learn how to be victorious over all of life’s challenges by caressing them with tenderness and stillness.

Swinging her magical Snowflake Ko'o (wand), Poli'ahu happily skips over the hardened lava on the majestic Mauna Kea Volcano. She is enchanted by the beauty of the mountain and eager to share the blessing of her powerful Mana (spiritual energy) with her Ohana (family) and friends.
Poli’ahu is named after the Hawaiian Snow Goddess who resides on the summit of Mauna Kea (White Mountain), the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Poli’ahu’s name means caress. Her serene, gentle Mana (spiritual energy) is like the caress of a soft, pure, white snow blanket.
'Io, the Hawaiian Hawk, is Poli’ahu’s Aumakua (ancestral spirit) and her loyal companion.
'Io is just a baby hawk. He loves to play and ride on Poli'ahu’s right hand revealing his miraculous powers and loving concerns to her.
'Io appears whenever Poli'ahu calls on him but he also often comes on his own at important times of change, when he knows that his advise is needed. 'Io always lands on Poli'ahu’s right hand where she greets him with love and respect. He gently chirps sweet songs and secret messages in Poli’ahu’s ear, guiding her even deeper into her place of inner stillness.

Like the Hawaiian Snow Goddess, Poli’ahu is dressed in a white skirt and top symbolizing a mantle of snow on the mountain. Her hair is adorned with a white tiara and silver crystals much like the icicles on the summit of Mauna Kea. Poli'ahu also wears white crocheted panties and matching shoes adorned with crystals. Crystals inspire spiritual strength, unity and love.


Poli'ahu is about 4” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Poli'ahu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.
'Io is made out of brown synthetic fur and feathers. The eyes are black crystals. The beak is hand molded out of clay.
All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Poli'ahu and I'o are one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Poli'ahu and ‘Io reflect the majestic Mana of Mauna Kea.



Sunday, November 22, 2015

Leilani, the Christmas Angel


The sacred sound of the Pu (Conch Shell) echoes across the ‘Aina (land) calling Leilani, the Menehune Guardian Angel to earth. Leilani’s heavenly Mana (spiritual energy) radiates the power of unconditional Aloha (love).
Leilani's home is Lanikeha, the heaven. The heavenly light of Leilani’s candle illuminates the paths of the Menehune’s lives on earth.
The Menehunes know Leilani always watches over them enlightening their lives with her angelic presence.


Hearing the divine calling of the Pu in the distance, the Menehunes sense that Leilani is near. Sometimes she allows them a glance at the heavenly glow of her shell candle and magical Pua Kalikimakas (Christmas Flowers) or a glimpse of her angelic white feather wings passing by to remind them how brightly the Aloha spirit is shining from their own souls. All they have to do is call and Leilani appears offering her wisdom and guidance.

Welcome Leilani as your guardian angel! She is devoted to protecting and guiding you on your life’s journey.

Leilani often rests among the Pine trees in the serene Hawaiian forest, worshiping the beautiful world around her. She never tires of rejoicing in the abundant splendor of nature.

Leilani wears a Tapa cloth dress with a Honu (turtle) design, red crocheted panties and matching shoes adorned with crystals. The Pua Kalikimaka (poinsettia) flowers in her hair and on her dress represent purity and love.


Leilani is about 4” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Leilani has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.  She is holding an shell with a candle in her hands. The angel wings are crafted out of real white feathers. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Leilani is a one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She is a collector’s item bringing you the spiritual power of Hawaii.

In the spirit of Christmas Leilani’s Mana radiates heavenly unconditional Aloha.


Sunday, November 15, 2015

He'e Holua, Riding the Waves of Pele


‘Riding the waves of Pele’ refers to the ancient art of lava sledding in Hawaii. In this 2000 year old athletic ritual the natives risked their lives to honor Pele, the mystical Hawaiian Goddess of the Volcanoes.

Hawaiian Mountain Surfing

Standing, laying or sitting on their Holua sleds they would surf the lava of the volcanic slopes reaching over 50 mph. The Holua sled, 12 feet long, 6 inches wide and 4 inches in depth, was carved from native Ohia or Kauila wood. All the ancient Holua slides were built around Heiaus, altars of worship for Pele, the volcano Goddess.

In Hawaiian mythology Pele, the Hawaiian Fire Goddess and Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess were said to have been fierce rivals. One well known Hawaiian legend tells the story of Poli’ahu, the Snow Goddess, winning a he’e holua race on Mauna Kea, the greatest volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, against the Volcano Goddess Pele. Pele was so angry at being defeated that she threw streams of glowing lava at Poli’ahu who calmly brought down storms of snow and froze the molten rock into place.
Pele surrendered and never again stepped onto Poli’ahu’s territory on Mauna Kea. The power of fire was pacified by Poli’ahu’s calmness.

Hawaii’s sacred sledding inspired the creation of Mu, the Menehune Christmas Elf.
Mu’s miniature sled was constructed following the concept of ancient Hawaiian sleds.

Mu, the Menehune Christmas Elf

Birthdate: Kekemapa 24th, 2013 (12/24/13)

“Mele Kalikimaka!” (Merry Christmas)

Mu's voice and the sacred sound of the Pu (Conch Shell) echo across the ‘Aina (land) as he zooms down the mountain slopes on his Holua (Hawaiian sled) ringing his Christmas bell. Mu’s Holua is loaded with gifts for his Menehune Ohana (family). There is a basket with the Menehune’s favorite treats, Mai’as (bananas),a big Kahiki (pineapple) and a perfect Niu (coconut), but there also is a box wrapped in tapa cloth (bark cloth) with a big red bow. It holds a secret present, a magical treasure which will fulfill somebody’s most heartfelt desire.

Mu carries a big surprise for you! Close your eyes, make a wish and get ready to open your magical gift!

Mu is the Menehune’s Christmas Elf. He wears red elf shoes with a matching Santa Claus hat. Mu’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed all these clothes for him. She also crocheted his green shorts and wove her Mana (spiritual energy) into the green Hulu (feather) lei he wears around his hat. In Hawaii the Hulu is believed to link to the divine.
Last she draped a Conch shell amulet around Mu’s neck to protect her Mo’opuna Kane (grandson) on his dangerous sled rides down Hawaii’s volcanic mountain slopes.

Mu and his Kuku (grandfather) built the Holua together. They carved it out of Hawaiian Kauila wood and tied a railing with raffia to both sides of the sled. They surrounded the sled with Conch shells to assure that Mu will always be save and protected on his Holua.
All these precious things were Mu’s Kupuna’s (grandparents) gift of Aloha (love) to their beloved Mo’opuna Kane .


Mu is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Mu has little hands and feet, elf ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Mu is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
Mu comes with his sled, story and a certificate of authenticity.

Mu conveys the magical Mana of the Hawaiian Kalikimaka.



Sunday, November 1, 2015

Manini, the Fisher Boy

Birth Date: Nowemapa 1, 2015 (11-1-15)

Manini teaches us to see with the heart and act with compassion.

Little Manini, the Fisher Boy, is named after one of Hawaii's favorite fish: The small Manini that tastes so good!
Carrying his fishing pole to the gentle waters in the bays of Punalu’u Black Sands Beach, Manini gets ready to catch dinner for his Menehune Ohana (family) and himself. First he says a prayer of heartfelt thanks for nature’s abundant offerings. He then humbly asks permission for just enough fish to come to his fishing pole so that he can feed himself and his Ohana.

Manini has a balanced, harmonious relationship with nature. He knows that if he takes only what he needs, it will always be given freely.

Manini's Mana (spiritual energy) is Aloha (love) and compassion. He is the most generous little Menehune. Nothing makes Manini happier than sharing the fish he caught with his Menehune Ohana, so that everybody can have an abundant, delicious dinner. Seeing their joy and appreciation is the greatest gift to him. Manini knows that the more he gives, the more he will receive.

 
Manini’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed his blue Malu (wraparound) and matching hat with a fish design. She crocheted yellow underwear and little shoes. Last Tutu crafted a conch shell lei for Manini. In Hawaii the Pu (Conch Shell) is believed to invoke blessings of divine Mana and provide protection from all harm.
Manini's Kuku (grandfather) made and blessed his bamboo fishing pole which always catches just enough fish for the Ohana’s dinner.
All these things were Kuku's and Tutu’s sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).

Manini is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Manini has little hands, feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Manini is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Manini conveys a balanced, harmonious relationship with nature.




Tuesday, October 20, 2015

The Music of Hawaii

(Fern and Hawaiian Goose)
Birth Date: ʻOkakopa 15, 2015 (10/15/15)

Kupu’s music illuminates life with joy and happiness.

Aloha
Akahai e na Hawai'i
Lokahi aku like
'Olu'olu kamana'o
Ha'aha'a kou kulana
'Ahonui a lanakila

Be modest people of Hawai‘i
Be harmonious
Be truthful
Humble yourselves
Have fortitude
Aloha brings life and healing

Hana Hou! (Encore!) Hana Hou! The Menehunes clap their hands in delight, begging for some more of Kupu’s divine music. In harmony with the enchanting sound of the Ukulele, Kupu and Baby Nene (Hawaiian Goose) sing a melodious song that touches the heart and reaches into the ancestor’s world. Kupu and Nene are honoring the Akuas (spirits) of the beautiful, secluded mountains in Kau on the Big Island of Hawaii.
They sing about the Menehune Ohana (family), Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe. Kupu's and Nene's cheerful Mana (Spiritual Energy) brightens up the day with love and laughter. Celebrating Hawaii’s Aloha spirit, the Menehunes dance through the forest to the rhythm of the wonderful music.
Baby Nene quacks and waddles along happily. The Nene Goose enhances the life and spirit of Hawaii. Nene means to cherish. She is Kupu’s Aumakua (guardian spirit) and the two of them are inseparable.


Kupu is named after the Hawaiian tree ferns which represent spiritual strength, unity and love. His Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Fern leis he wears around his head and on his white malu (loin cloth). Tutu also crocheted Kupu's brown pants and matching shoes and crafted a belt to hold up his malu.
His Ukulele has been handed down through generations and was Kupu’s (grandfather’s) gift of lasting love and Aloha to his Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).  It is Kupu’s most cherished possession. He holds it even when he goes to sleep.

Kupu is about 3.5” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. Nene is about 1” tall. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kupu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.  All accessories were individually handcrafted.


In the evenings Kupu often accompanies the Hula dances of his little sister Lili with his Ukulele. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Kupu and Nene are one of a kind display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Kupu and Nene attune us to the spirit of Hawaii.



Thursday, October 15, 2015

Aloha


Aloha
Akahai e na Hawai'i
Lokahi aku like
'Olu'olu kamana'o
Ha'aha'a kou kulana
'Ahonui a lanakila


Be modest people of Hawai‘i
Be harmonious 
Be truthful 
Humble yourselves 
Have fortitude
Aloha brings life and healing

 Kumu Kawaikapuokalani K. Hewett



(Fern and Hawaiian Goose)
Birth Date: ʻOkakopa 15, 2015 (10/15/15)

Kupu’s music illuminates life with joy and happiness.

Hana Hou! (Encore!) Hana Hou! The Menehunes clap their hands in delight, begging for some more of Kupu’s divine music. In harmony with the enchanting sound of the Ukulele, Kupu and Baby Nene (Hawaiian Goose) sing a melodious song that touches the heart and reaches into the ancestor’s world. Kupu and Nene are honoring the Akuas (spirits) of the beautiful, secluded mountains in Kau on the Big Island of Hawaii.
They sing about the Menehune Ohana (family), Hawaiian animals, the forest, the ocean, and the stars in the Universe. Kupu's and Nene's cheerful Mana (Spiritual Energy) brightens up the day with love and laughter. Celebrating Hawaii’s Aloha spirit, the Menehunes dance through the forest to the rhythm of the wonderful music.
Baby Nene quacks and waddles along happily. The Nene Goose enhances the life and spirit of Hawaii. Nene means to cherish. She is Kupu’s Aumakua (guardian spirit) and the two of them are inseparable.


 Kupu is named after the Hawaiian tree ferns which represent spiritual strength, unity and love. His Tutu (grandmother) wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha (love) into the Fern leis he wears around his head and on his white malu (loin cloth). Tutu also crocheted Kupu's brown pants and matching shoes and crafted a belt to hold up his malu.
His Ukulele has been handed down through generations and was Kupu’s (grandfather’s) gift of lasting love and Aloha to his Mo’opuna Kane (grandson).  It is Kupu’s most cherished possession. He holds it even when he goes to sleep.


Kupu is about 3.5” tall, fitting in the palm of your hand. Nene is about 1” tall. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Kupu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button.  All accessories were individually handcrafted.

In the evenings Kupu often accompanies the Hula dances of his little sister Lili with his Ukulele. In perfect harmony they express their Aloha Aina (love of the land).

Kupu and Nene are a one of a kind display dollws handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. 

Kupu and Nene attune us to the spirit of Hawaii.


Wednesday, September 30, 2015

He'e Wahine I Ka Lani - Goddess of the Surf


He'e Wahine I Ka Lani!
Goddess in the Surf! 
He'e Ana I Ka Lala,
Sliding across the face of a wave,
Ho'iana I Kamuku 
 returning to the curl.

Surfing began in Hawaii as early as the 3rd or 4th century CE. Hawaiian surfer girls were called Wahine and equal to me in the sport. Wahines are remembered for their grace, style, dominance and Mana in competitive surfing. Wahines loved to surf. Even the Ali'i (royalty), like King Kamehameha and his Queen Kaahumanu, were said to have surfed side by side.

"A large percentage of Wahines of early Hawaii was skillful surfers and often champions."

Native Mo'olelos (legends) give the highest honors in this skillful and daring sport to the Wahines:
Me Kui O Mamala, one of the best surfing spots on Oahu, was named after Mamala, a famous woman surfer and Kupua with supernatural powers.
According to legend, Mamala left her husband Ouha, the Shark Man, for another man named Honokaupu. Terribly upset, Ouha shed his human form and became the Shark God of the coast between Waikiki and Koko Head.

Amy was created in honor of all the magnificent women surfers of the past and present.

Amy, Goddess of the Surf
Birth Date: Kepakemapa 22, 2015 (09-22-15)

Amy inspires us to surrender to the waves of life with focus and balance, allowing them to safely carry us to our highest goals.

He'e Wahine I Ka Lani! 
Amy is a Goddess in the Surf!

Amy's best friend and greatest teacher is the ocean. Amy is a Menehune He’e Nalu
When the surf is up, Amy runs down to Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. She can’t wait to get into the ocean. Her heart dances with Hopupu (excitement) as she eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves.
Amy loves the Pacific Ocean and the surf has been her greatest teacher, evoking deep respect and humbleness within her. She knows that every wave presents a challenge of going with its flow. Amy watches the waves, feels them inside, and connects to their Mana (spiritual energy).
She flies along the sea on her Olo (surfboard), riding the waves with focus and balance. Amy finds the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility and rides the great wave home. It is the very best feeling in the world.


Surfing is magical; it has become her way of life! Amy is a Goddess in the surf!

Amy and her Kuku(grandfather) made the Olo (surfboard) together. First they chose the right Hawaiian Wiliwili tree for the board. Before cutting the tree, they faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. They honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish beneath it. Last Amy and Kuku drew a big Hawaiian Honu (sea turtle) on the Olo. The Honu is Amy's Aumakua (Guardian Spirit). Amy is deeply connected with the ancient wisdom of the Turtle. The Hawaiian Honu represents long life, safety, peace, and good luck. Amy always feels protected when she surfs because she knows that her Aumakua is watching over her.
The wooden Olo is Amy’s most treasured possession. She always carries it with her, even when she goes to sleep.
Amy’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed her red and turquoise bikini with a white Hibiscus flower design and crocheted matching turquoise shoes. She tied Amy's beautiful black hair with a turquoise band to keep it out of her eyes while she surfs. Last Tutu lovingly put a fragrant white and turquoise Plumeria flower in her hair.
All these things were Tutu’s and Kuku's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo'opuna Wahine (granddaughter).


Amy is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. Her body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto her face. Amy has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.
Amy is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. She comes with her story and a certificate of authenticity.


Amy reflects the spiritual powers of the Hawaiian Waters.


Amy is available on special order. Please contact me at: menehunebabies@gmail.com or visit my website at:

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Opihi, the Favorite Pupu of Hawaii


Hinuhinu wale i ka lihi o ke kai
Shining there at the sea's edge

Me he pai pu`u ala i ho`opuu `ia
Clustered like little hills

`O ka `opihi hälala
The giant Opihi

In old Hawaii Opihi were said to have grown as large as oranges because, with their great respect to the 'Aina and  refraining from all greed and waste, Hawaiians picked only what they needed. In those days Opihi lived longer and grew bigger than today, when they grow only to about the size of a golf ball.

Opihi are small cone shaped limpets which cling to the rest cry shorelines of Hawaii. Extraordinarily strong by nature, they survive during the hot and dry periods of low tide and the pounding waves of high tide. Up to this day Opihi picketrs risk and often loose their lives picking these delicious shells. The best Opihi with the yellow meat are found on the rocks where the waves are the roughest. Always aware of the unpredictable dangers of the ocean,  Hawaiians made sure to never turn their backs to the water while using a stick to pry the Opihi off the rocks.
They referred to Ohihi as'he ia make' meaning ' a creature that could cause death'. 

Opihi was and is Hawaii's favorite Pupu (snack). It is often eaten right out of the shell. In old Hawaii the oval shaped cells with their sharp edges were always saved to be used as a tool for scraping, peeling and scooping.


Today Opihi shells are also used to make beautiful jewelry like pendants or earrings.
Unique to Hawaii, Opihi play a key role in the marine ecosystem by keeping shoreline algae growth in check.


Menehune Boy Opihi was created in appreciation of this favorite Hawaiian Pupu (snack).

Opihi
Birthdate: Kepakemapa 25, 2015 (09/25/2015)

Look at Opihi and let your thoughts too become the seeds of what you wish to harvest!

Opihi is named after the limpet shells which grow in abundance on the cliffs of the Pacific Ocean and are considered a delicacy in Hawaii.

Opihi can’t wait to pick the delicious shells for his Ohana (family) and himself. But picking Opihi on the cliffs is very dangerous. Opihi’s Kupua Kane (grandfather) promised that he will teach him how to pick them when he is a little bit older.
In the meantime Opihi is content to fill his fishing net with the delicious mussels he finds at Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. Dinner will be a feast for his Ohana and him!
Opihi loves to play. While he patiently fills his net with mussels, he visualizes what it will be like when his Menehune Kaukinis (cousins), Nai'a and Amy, come down to the beach and they start playing together. Opihi imagines how they will swim in the ocean, build castles in the black sand, and play races with the black beach crabs. They will have a blast!
Opihi knows that his thoughts are like seeds which grow into reality. Sure enough, there comes Nai'a and Amy and the fun begins!


Opihi’s Tutu (grandmother) polished the most beautiful Opihi shell crafted and put it on her her Mo'opuna Kane's (grandson's) head to protect him from the blazing sun at the beach. Then Tutut crafted and blessed his Opihi shell amulet. She also sewed his red Malu (wraparound) with a dolphin design and crocheted little red shoes. All these things were Tutu's gifts of Aloha to her beloved Mo'opuna Kane.

Opihi is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. The body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Opihi has little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All accessories were individually handcrafted.

Opihi is a one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls. He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.


Opihi conveys the power of thoughts.


Opihi is available on special order. Please contact me at: menehunebabies@gmail.com or visit my website at:





Tuesday, September 8, 2015

'Ihi'ihi, Hawaiian Clover, the Good Luck Charm


How many times in life do we wish for good luck for ourselves and the ones close to us? 
Hawaiian Good Luck Doll 'Ihi'ihi (Clover) can help.

 'Ihi'ihi conveys good luck, fortune and well being to all who are around her.
'Ihi'ihi's gift to you is the beautiful Pu (Conch Shell) she carries. In Hawaii the Pu is said to attract prosperity and good fortune.


Saturday, August 29, 2015

Nene Goose, Hawaii's State Bird

In the Hawaiian language, Nene means to cherish.


Honored as Hawaii’s state bird, the Nene Goose enhances the life and spirit of Hawaii.
As the world's rarest goose, Nene is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands and considered an endangered species.
Nene is a shy and modest bird who meanders on the Hawaiian Islands carefully selecting leaves, berries and grassblades to eat.

Nene sings a melodious rhythmic song that touches the heart and reaches into the ancestor’s world. 

Gratitude for Nene reminding us of the perfection of nature, inspired the creation of Baby Nene as the Aumakua (guardian spirit) of  Menehune girl Ipu

Ipu (Gourd)
Birthdate: 'Aukake 29, 2015 (8-29-15)

“E Alae!”
(Arise!)

Ipu’s prayers invoke inspiration, protection and wisdom.

In harmony to the sacred beat of the Ipu (gourd), Menehune girl Ipu and Baby Nene (Hawaiian Goose) sing a melodious rhythmic song that touches the heart and reaches into the ancestor’s world. Ipu and Nene are honoring the Akuas (spirits) of the enchanting, secluded mountains in Kau on the Big Island of Hawaii.
Baby Nene waddles along happily. The Nene Goose enhances the life and spirit of Hawaii. Nene means to cherish. She is Ipu’s Aumakua (guardian spirit) and the two of them are inseparable. 
Ipu and Nene are headed to the sacred Heiau (Altar), where Ipu prays and worships the beauty of Hawaii. 

Ipu includes everybody she loves into her Pules (prayers). She prays for peace, harmony, happiness, and abundance. 

Ipu's Tutu (grandmother) sewed her white dress with a big pink Puakenikeni flower in the front She crocheted pink panties and matching shoes and wove a Lauhala sunhat.
Tutu wove her Mana (spiritual energy) and Aloha into Ipu's Maile Lei. Maile represents spiritual strength, unity and love. Last Tutu adorned the dress and Ipu's hair with the fragrant, pink Puakenikeni flowers. Ipu is named after the Hawaiian Ipus which grow on a vine. Ipu's Tutu picked the most beautiful one for her beloved Mo'opuna (Granddaughter). She cleaned, polished and decorated it with a crystal. It was her sacred gift of Aloha (Love) to Ipu and became her most treasured possession.

Ipu is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. Nene is about 1” tall. The bodies are made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto the face. Ipu has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. All of Ipu’s and Nene’s accessories were individually handcrafted.

Ipu and Nene are one of a kind collectible display dolls handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
They come with their story and a certificate of authenticity.

Ipu’s Mana attunes us to the spirit of Hawaii.







Friday, August 14, 2015

He'e Nalu, the Hawaiian Art of Surfing


Hawaii is a surfer’s paradise. Volcanic activity, mild weather, and coral reefs create perfect and challenging waves on white, golden, green and black sand beaches. When the surf is up, the surfer’s heart dances with excitement as he eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves. The ancient Hawaiians called this feeling “hopupu”. Surfing means riding the waves with focus and balance, finding the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility. Surfers describe it as the very best feeling in the world.
They share a love for the ocean. It becomes their greatest teacher evoking deep respect, humbleness, and fear. With relaxed alertness the surfer watches the ever changing tide, the swell building or fading, the shape of the wave; until he finds the break and rides one of those big waves home.

Surfing requires intense focus, strength, courage, and grace. 


He'e Nalu

The history of surfing in Hawaii goes back to the 4th century A.D. To the ancient Hawaiian people surfing was a spiritual form of art which they integrated into their culture. They called it he’e nalu which means wave sliding. The art of riding the waves was a deeply spiritual skill and ritual in ancient Hawaii. The ceremony began with the creation of the olo (surfboard). After choosing a WiliWili, Ula, or Koa tree, Hawaiians faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. Then they honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish underneath it.
Before entering the great ocean, Hawaiians performed a ceremony of special dances and chants asking for strength, protection, and great surf.
Around 1820, the missionaries prohibited surfing in Hawaii and it became nearly extinct until in 1905 a group of native Hawaiians, led by Duke Kahanamoku, revived surfing on the islands.

Today, surfing in Hawaii has become a way of life.


The magic of surfing inspired the creation of Iniki (Strong Wind), a Miniature Hawaiian Menehune Doll. 

Iniki (Strong Wind)
Birth Date: 'Aukake 7, 2015 (08-07-15)

Iniki inspires us to surrender to the winds and waves of life with focus and balance, allowing them to safely carry us to our highest goals.

Iniki's best friend and greatest teacher is the ocean. Iniki is a Menehune He’e Nalu (surfer) boy. He is named after the strong winds of the Pacific Ocean.
When the surf is up, Iniki can’t wait to get into the ocean. His heart dances with Hopupu (excitement) as he eagerly anticipates the challenges of the great waves.
Iniki loves the Pacific Ocean and the surf has been his greatest teacher, evoking deep respect and humbleness within him. He knows that every wave along with the wind presents a challenge of going with its flow. Iniki watches the waves, feels them inside, and connects to their Mana (spiritual energy).
Like the wind, he flies along the sea on his Olo (surfboard), riding the waves with focus and balance, Iniki finds the perfect attitude between tension and flexibility and rides the great wave home. It is the very best feeling in the world. 

Surfing is magical; it has become his way of life!

Iniki's Aumakua (guardian spirit) is Mano, the shark. It is a great honor in Hawaii to have the shark as your Aumakua. Mano evokes leadership, strength, and courage. Iniki always feels protected when he surfs because he knows that his Aumakua is watching over him. In honor of his Aumakua, Iniki wears a necklace with a shark tooth pendant around his neck. Like all the other, cool Menehune surfer boys Iniki also has a small, turquoise earring in his left ear.
Iniki and his Kuku(grandfather) made the Olo (surfboard) together. First they chose the right Hawaiian Wiliwili tree for the board. Before cutting the tree, they faced towards the sea and said a prayer of thanks for the wood they would use. They honored the spirit of the tree by burying a fish beneath it. The wooden Olo is Iniki’s most treasured possession. He always carries it with him, even when he goes to sleep. 
Iniki’s Tutu (grandmother) sewed his red Lava lava (wraparound) with a white Hibiscus flower design. She crocheted matching turquoise shoes and gave Iniki a head band to keep his hair out of his eyes while he surfs. Last Tutu draped the Mano pendant around his neck and put a turquoise earring in his left ear.
All these things were Tutu’s and Kuku's sacred gifts of Aloha (Love) to their beloved Mo'opuna Kane (grandson).


Iniki is about 4” tall fitting in the palm of your hand. His body is made out of stretch cotton and wired for flexibility. The eyes and mouth are intricately embroidered onto his face. Iniki has tiny little hands and feet, ears, buttocks, and a belly button. His doll stand is a white piece of coral from Punalu’u Black Sands Beach. All accessories were individually handcrafted.


Iniki is a one of a kind collectible display doll handcrafted by Hawaiian Dolls.
He comes with his story and a certificate of authenticity.

Iniki reflects the spiritual powers of the Hawaiian Winds and Waters.

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